William Hitchcock headshot
WH

William Ingersoll Hitchcock

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of History
Office location and address
Nau 285
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.A. Kenyon College, 1986
Ph.D. Yale University, 1994
HIST 1501: Introductory Seminar in History
Credits: 3
Introduction to the study of history intended for first- and second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIST 2214: The Cold War
Credits: 3
An exploration of the geopolitical and ideological conflict that dominated world affairs from 1945 to 1990. Assignments include the readings of historical work, as well as primary sources, some of which are recetly declassified material from the major states involved in the Cold War.
MDST 2559: New Course in Media Studies
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Media Studies.
HIST 3162: War and Society in the Twentieth Century
Credits: 3
This class will explore the impact of war upon society during the twentieth century, including World Wars I and II; conflicts in Korea and Vietnam; wars of national liberation and decolonization; and small-scale 'counter-insurgency' conflicts. Topics covered include: popular mobilization for war;civil liberties in wartime; civilian casualties; the ethics of violence; genocide; technology; and cultural production in wartime societies.
HIEU 3312: Europe at War, 1939-45: Occupation, Genocide, Resistance
Credits: 3
This course examines the range of human experience in Europe during the Second World War. Why did Nazi Germany invade and attempt to colonize large parts of Europe? What were the methods of Nazi rule? How did European peoples respond to the Nazi project, whether through forms of resistance or collaboration? Who were the principal victims of the war--and why is this question so difficult to address even today?
HIST 3452: The Second World War
Credits: 3
This course provides a survey of the greatest, most destructive war in human history. Perhaps 50 million people were killed in the Second World War, and the conflict reached every corner of the globe. Its political, social, and human consequences were vast and shape the world we live in today.
HIST 4501: Major Seminar
Credits: 4
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4502: Seminar in Post-1700 European History
Credits: 4
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4993: Independent Study in European History
Credits: 1–3
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIST 5559: New Course in General History
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 7020: Twentieth Century World
Credits: 3
This graduate seminar for PhD students explores the recent scholarship in international and transnational history of the twentieth century. It exposes students to work on imperialism, ideologies of global war and peacemaking, radical political ideologies of the right and the left, global economic upheaval, genocide, refugee and humanitarian movements, decolonization, modernization, the United Nations, and the post-Cold War world.
HIST 8998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
HIST 8999: Research in History
Credits: 1–12
For master's essay and other research carried out prior to advancement to candidacy, taken under the supervision of the student's adviser.
HIUS 9025: Tutorial in Post-World War II U.S. Political History
Credits: 3
This course will survey the history and historiography of American politics and political economy from 1945 to the present. Readings and meetings will address major themes in American political history, including: liberalism and conservatism, education, housing, suburbanization and the urban crisis, racial inequality, and the culture wars.
HIST 9026: Tutorial in 20th Century International History
Credits: 3
Readings in modern international history: topics will include war, peace-making, diplomacy, the role of non-governmental organizations in world politics, refugees, human rights, decolonization, and transnational ideologies.
HIST 9960: Readings in History
Credits: 3
This course is a graduate-level adaptation of an undergraduate course in history. The graduate-level adaption requires additional research, readings, or other academic work established by the instructor beyond the undergraduate syllabus.
HIST 9961: Supervised Reading and Tutorial
Credits: 3
Graduate study of the historiography of a particular topic or historical period, equivalent to a graduate-level colloquium course. Prerequisites: Approval of director of graduate studies or department chair.
HIST 9962: General Exam Preparation
Credits: 3
In this course, students will prepare for the general examination under the guidance of a faculty examiner. During the course, the student will identify relevant readings; complete and review those readings; and explore the larger questions raised by those readings and their fields more generally.
HIST 9964: Master's Essay Revision
Credits: 3
This course is intended for PhD candidates to revise their master's essays for publication under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. It is typically taken in first semester of the second year of study.
HIST 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 3–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
HIST 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

2009 George Louis Beer Prize, American Historical Association.

Finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.

Finalist for the 2009 Mark Lynton History Prize.

Yale University: 1999 Sarai Ribicoff Teaching Award