TB

Tim Beatley

Professor
Unit: School of Architecture
Department: Department of Urban and Environmental Planning
Office location and address
Campbell Hall 310
110 Bayly Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.C.P., The University of Virginia, 1979
M.U.P., The University of Oregon, 1981
M.A., The University of North Carolina, 1984
Ph.D., The University of North Carolina, 1986
Biography

Timothy Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities, in the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture at the University of Virginia, where he has taught for the last twenty-five years. Much of Beatley’s work focuses on the subject of sustainable communities, and creative strategies by which cities and towns can fundamentally reduce their ecological footprints, while at the same time becoming more livable and equitable places. Beatley believes that sustainable and resilient cities represent our best hope for addressing today’s environmental challenges.

AR-PLAN Global Collaborative Platform for Biophilic Cities
Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
December 15, 2017 – September 01, 2020
Charting the Path Forward for the Biophilic Cities Network
Source: Greater Washington Community Foundation
November 01, 2018 – June 01, 2020
AR-PLAN Expanding the Global Reach of Biophilic Cities
Source: The Summit Charitable Foundation, Inc.
April 15, 2017 – December 01, 2018
AS-SPAN Cultural Touchstones: Mining, Refining, and the Languages of Empire in the Early Americas
Source: The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botan
July 01, 2017 – June 30, 2018
Expanding the Global Reach of Biophilic Cities
Source: Summit Consulting LLC
July 15, 2016 – July 01, 2017
AR-Global Biophilic Cities Network: Design and Roll-Out
Source: The Summit Charitable Foundation, Inc.
December 01, 2015 – March 31, 2017
AR- The Summit Foundation - Planning
Source: The Summit Charitable Foundation, Inc.
December 01, 2014 – May 31, 2016
EN-SE xx-LAUNCH 2020-Systems Innovation Experiment (SIX)
Source: Tides Foundation
January 01, 2013 – March 31, 2014
The Summit Foundation - Sustainable Cities
Source: The Summit Charitable Foundation, Inc.
January 01, 2012 – February 01, 2014
AR-Faculty-Student Technical Assistance on Adaptation to Sea Level Rise for Virginia Communities
Source: William & Mary Virginia Institute of Marine Scienc
May 01, 2012 – April 30, 2013
PLAN 1010: Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Credits: 3
Analyzes community and environmental planning in the United States; the planning process; and sustainable communities.
PLAN 3840: Ethics of Cities and Environment
Credits: 3
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity. Graduate course will have additional course requirements
PLAN 3860: Cities and Nature
Credits: 3
This class begins with the premise that contact with nature is essential to modern life.The class will examine the evidence for why nature in important,and the many creative ways in which cities can plan for,and design-in nature, and foster meaningful and everyday connections with the natural world.
PLAN 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.
PLAN 4999: Planning Senior Project
Credits: 3
Note: Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students may, with instructor permission, enroll in selected 5000-level courses.
PLAN 5500: Special Topics in Planning
Credits: 1–4
Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.
PLAN 5840: Ethics of Cities and Environment
Credits: 3
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity.
PLAN 5993: Applied Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Individual study directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAC 5993: Applied Independent Study
Credits: 1–6
Applied independent study.
PLAN 6840: Ethics of Cities and Environment
Credits: 3
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity. Graduate course will have additional course requirements.
PLAN 6860: Cities + Nature
Credits: 3
This class begins with the premise that contact with nature is essential to modern life.The class will examine the evidence for why nature in important,and the many creative ways in which cities can plan for,and design-in nature, and foster meaningful and everyday connections with the natural world.
PLAN 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.
PLAN 8800: Teaching Experience
Credits: 3
Involves serving as a teaching assistant for a course, with teaching assignments coordinated by the chair. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
PLAN 8840: Adv Ethics of Environmental & Cities
Credits: 3
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity. Graduate Students will undertake additional course requirements.
PLAN 8998: Non-Topical Research, Masters
Credits: 1–12
For Thesis Preparation, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PLAN 8999: Master's Thesis
Credits: 3–6
A thesis is optional for the Master of Urban and Environmental Planning degree. Students should begin early to explore topics and to identify potential committee members. A guideline document is available.
SARC 9998: Non-Topical Doctoral Prep
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
SARC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.