Suzanne Morse Moomaw
SM

Suzanne Morse Moomaw

Associate Professor
Director of Undergraduate Programs, Urban & Environmental Planning
Director, Community Design Research Center
Unit: School of Architecture
Department: Department of Urban and Environmental Planning
Office location and address
Campbell Hall 109
110 Bayly Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D., The University of Alabama
M.A., The University of Alabama in Birmingham
B.A., The University of Alabama
Biography

Suzanne Morse Moomaw has spent the last three decades observing communities through social, design, and political lens at local, regional, national, and international scales. Her teaching in community economic development challenges students to consider possibilities and create transdisciplinary solutions to the “wicked” problems facing civilization. She involves students--both in and out of the classroom--in wrestling with the systemic causes of issues such as poverty, racial inequities, economic restructuring, and housing patterns through historical and cultural frames.

Her primary courses are Housing and Community Development, Economic Development, Advanced Housing Seminar, and the Neighborhood Planning Studio. The studio gives students the opportunity to use their knowledge of planning and design to reimagine "place” in collaboration with a community partner. Over the years, students have designed a dedicated service center for public housing developments, addressed the challenges of increasing jobs in low-to-middle income neighborhoods, and proposed scenarios for better connecting neighborhoods in cities reeling from economic downturns. She founded and co-teaches the Sustainable Europe program in Switzerland, Italy, and Germany offered during Summer Sessions. 

AR-CIVICread Seminar: A Pan University Civic Renewal Seminar Series
Source: Bringing Theory to Practice
April 08, 2014 – June 30, 2016
SARC 1500: SARC Seminars
Credits: 1
SARC 1500 courses are 1-credit seminars capped at 20 first-year students, all of whom are assigned to the instructor as advisees. They are topically focused on an area identified by the faculty member; they also include a significant advising component centered on undergraduate issues (e.g., choosing a major, study abroad opportunities, undergraduate research, etc.).
PLAN 3030: Neighborhoods, Community and Regions
Credits: 3
Explores theories and concepts of economic, social, and cultural forces that influence urban and regional spatial structure.
ZFOR 3506: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
PLAN 3870: Environment and the Economy
Credits: 3
Focuses on a central question: Can local economies be sustainable and equitable without damaging the environment? Within this question are embedded topics-environmental racism, brownfield reclamation, environmental policy, and community organizing and engagement. This course addresses the challenge of balancing environmental impact, social equity, and economic growth.
PLAC 4010: Neighborhood Planning Studio
Credits: 4
Explores neighborhood, planning issues from the professionals' and citizens' perspectives. Cross-listed with PLAC 5610.
PLAN 4800: Professional Practice
Credits: 1–3
Structured internship experience and reporting as a reflective practitioner for ten weeks or 200 hours of experience.
PLAN 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.
PLAN 4999: Planning Senior Project
Credits: 3
Note: Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students may, with instructor permission, enroll in selected 5000-level courses.
PLAN 5400: Housing and Community Development
Credits: 3
Provides an introduction to the housing and community development area of planning practice. Topics include the housing and development industries, neighborhood change processes, social aspects of housing and development, and housing and development programs and policy issues.
PLAN 5420: Economic Development
Credits: 3
Explores the economy of a community, neighborhood, or region as an essential element, in livability and sustainability. Planners engage economic development by working with the community to assess needs and opportunities, through public-private business partnerships, and in development review.
PLAN 5500: Special Topics in Planning
Credits: 1–4
Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.
PLAC 5610: Neighborhood Planning Studio
Credits: 4
Explores neighborhood, planning issues from the professionals' and citizens' perspectives. Cross-listed with PLAC 5610.
PLAN 5870: Environment and the Economy
Credits: 3
Focuses on a central question: Can local economies be sustainable and equitable without damaging the environment? Within this question are embedded topics' environmental racism, brownfield reclamation, environmental policy, and community organizing and engagement. Graduate course will have additional course requirements. The course addresses the challenges of balancing environment, economics, and equity.
PLAN 5993: Applied Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Individual study directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAN 8993: Independent Studies in Urban and Environmental Planning
Credits: 1–4
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
PLAN 8999: Master's Thesis
Credits: 3–6
A thesis is optional for the Master of Urban and Environmental Planning degree. Students should begin early to explore topics and to identify potential committee members. A guideline document is available.
SARC 9998: Non-Topical Doctoral Prep
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.

She was a 2015 recipient of the All University Teaching Award by the University of Virginia, and in 2017, she received the Outstanding Faculty Award from the Virginia Chapter of the American Planning Association. She was elected a Fellow in the 2017 Class of the Academy for Engaged Community Scholarship.