Stephen Levine headshot
SL

Stephen Lee Levine

Associate Professor
Unit: School of Continuing and Professional Studies
Department: SCPS - CP-Admin-Deans Office
Office location and address
Zehmer Hall
104 Midmont Ln
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Biography

Stephen Levine has been teaching courses on U.S. cultural history for the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) since 2006. Leaving a tenured position at the University of Maine to come to Charlottesville, Levine found BIS students a revelation. “They bring a mix of personal and professional experiences to discussions that you just don’t encounter in the traditional classroom." In 2014, he was appointed the program’s first full-time faculty member and is currently serving as its director and associate professor. When not in the classroom or directing BIS, Stephen can be found performing blues music or farming.

UVA Launchpad 2pt0
Source: The Kern Family Foundation
November 12, 2020 – October 31, 2021
ISLS 3000: Transformations: Reading, Thinking, and Communicating in the Liberal Arts
Credits: 3
Develops reading, writing, critical thinking, technology and research proficiencies necessary for success at college level and beyond; orients students to the culture of the University and the community of the BIS program. Introduces the breadth of campus resources and addresses academic advising; utilizes the theme of transformation as subject matter for reading, writing and discussion to provide opportunities for multi-disciplinary exploration.
PSHM 3010: Introduction to Health Care Management: Applying Concepts to Practice
Credits: 3
Provides an introduction to health care management for allied health practitioners. Integrates theory and practice through course presentations, readings, online discussions, experiential exercises, and written assignments. Emphasizes the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills, within multidisciplinary environments, to both health care practice and professional development.
ISLS 3010: Nationalism and National Identity
Credits: 3
Focuses on theories about the origins of nations; examines the historical and cultural substance of nations; and explores related questions about national identity, nationalism, ethnic violence, and citizenship. Considers contemporary alternatives to national identity, such as supranational movements and multinational organizations.
ISLS 3020: Critical Thinking: Why Do We Believe the Things We Do?
Credits: 3
This course focuses on a central question: 'Why do we believe the things we do?' This question will drive all of the individual writing and reading assignments. In this context students consider, from a multi-disciplinary perspective, topics such as: mental models, hidden assumptions and the place of implicit beliefs in reasoning; 'thin slicing' and the role of the 'adaptive unconscious' in decision making; propaganda, public relations and the role of the media in belief formation; the identification and evaluation of arguments and the difference between persuasive and cogent reasoning.
ISHU 3040: Contemporary American Literature in the Digital Age
Credits: 3
Examines how American authors explored the issue of technology when the age of television gradually yielded to the digital age. Considers how new forms of technology have fundamentally changed the ways in which realism is depicted in literature. Pays particular attention to those texts that engage with technoculture around the turn of the 21st century. Considers writers such as Don DeLillo, Dave Eggers, and Karen Tei Yamashita.
ISLS 3040: Decision Making in Public Organizations
Credits: 3
Examines the question of how public organizations make decisions and the techniques organizations use to arrive at the chosen options; considers major initiatives to day-to-day activities; examines public agencies at various levels of government, and the need to make far-reaching decisions which address a complex array of competing goals; presents theories of decision making and discusses recent decisions at various levels of government.
ISSS 3045: Science and Practice of Mindfulness
Credits: 3
Considers the latest scientific findings about the mind-body connection, offers students the opportunity to experience them through direct mindfulness meditative practices. Explores formal and informal mindfulness practices, the contextual background of mindfulness, and applies them to a variety of professions and settings. Covers a range of contemplative exercises that cultivate emotional balance and the ability to cope with stress.
PSHM 3050: Current Issues in Health Care
Credits: 1
Provides an introduction to the healthcare and healthcare management literature for allied healthcare professionals, building on the foundational knowledge provided in the concurrent PSHM 3010 Introduction to Healthcare Management. The course emphasizes the application of critical thinking and library research skills.
ISHU 3061: Sacred Paths: Introduction to World Religions
Credits: 3
Introduces six major religious traditions deeply rooted in different cultures including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Examines the historical evolution, the doctrines, beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions.
PSHM 3080: Legal and Ethical Decision-Making in Health Care
Credits: 3
Provides an overview of the laws governing health care institutions and the ethical dilemmas facing health care managers and providers; reviews ethical principles utilized to examine health care issues. Evaluates the procedures followed by health care organizations in making legal and ethical decisions; addresses such contemporary issues as cloning, euthanasia, and organ donation. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS program.
ISSS 3090: Religion in America
Credits: 3
Examines the concept of America and to what extent it is a product of religious mindsets of particular times. Explores multi-media materials, including: Hollywood films, 20th Century folk music, literature of the west, 18th Century primary sources, 19th Century theses on American identity, and 20th Century journalism and criticism.
ISLS 3100: Age of Discovery: Europe and the Wider World, 1500-1700
Credits: 3
Examines intellectual and social/political upheavals of the early modern period in Europe including the opening of the wider world to European explorers and traders. Considers the mutual impact of Western and non-Western civilizations through the analysis of primary sources including literature, maps, and works of art.
ISLS 3150: Genocide: Origins, Prevention, and Punishment
Credits: 3
Students address serious questions about mass violence; human rights; psychological, sociological, cultural and economic sources of human cruelty; and the responsibility of bystanders. Students also consider what genocide is, why it happens, where it has happened, how best to prevent it, and how to deal with perpetrators.
ISSS 3150: Constitutional Law
Credits: 3
Introduces students to the study of constitutional law and provides a good grounding in the methods the U.S. Supreme Court uses to interpret our Constitution. Examines the generally accepted methods of constitutional analysis through in-depth studies of landmark cases both historical and contemporary. Lays an initial foundation in an overview of federal judicial, legislative and executive powers.
ISSS 3160: Democracy in America
Credits: 3
Examines democracy, free speech, elections and the press; considers the role of a free press in a time of civil discord, challenges to free speech in America at large and on college campuses; evaluates threats to democracy and the electoral process by analyzing Russian hacking and the role of PACs and Super PACs; examines mainstream and social media, "fake news" and posits if democracy can survive in a culture of 24/7 news coverage and "tweets."
ISSS 3170: The Bill of Rights in the 21st Century
Credits: 3
This course examines the origins of the Bill of Rights and the specific rights listed, as well as the contours of those rights as they have been interpreted by the Supreme Court. The course addresses contemporary issues, including the right to bear arms, the relation between religion and government, and use of high-tech criminal investigative tools.
ISHU 3170: The Writer as Cartographer: A Class in Poetry and Memoir
Credits: 3
Just as a cartographer is one who makes maps, projecting an area of the earth's surface on a flat plane, so is a writer able to transform an imagined shape into real shape. In much the manner of a cartographer, a writer must "brave the elements" in order to come closer to an understanding of what is mysterious. With a focus upon poetry and memoir, this class will ask students to read widely, to respond to assigned readings through essays and annotations, to produce creative work on a weekly basis, and to share such work openly in a workshop setting.
ISHU 3180: Roots and Stems of Effective Writing -- The Essay
Credits: 3
Writing begins with intuition, moves towards consciousness and strives for clarity. Such movement, such unfolding, calls for a steady eye and an enduring approach. Accordingly, this class will focus upon resurrecting the fading art of patience, a faculty required for writing. The focus of the class will be on creative essays and academic essays. To convey thoughts effectively one must be willing to take the time to observe one's subject, accurately. It is necessary to attend ardently to the language in order to articulate our explorations, to argue our viewpoints. One must keep the hand practiced in the actual activity of writing. This class will ask students to read widely, to respond to assigned readings through weekly essays and to share work openly in a workshop setting with a focus on revision.
ISSS 3180: Critical Issues in Democracy
Credits: 3
Explores several critical issues in democracy, relating to both the United States and countries abroad, such as: the examination of ancient and modern theories of democracy, political parties, the Presidency, voting, foreign policy, and the development of international relations.
ISLS 3180: Possessing the Past
Credits: 3
This course explores various ways in which we seek to experience the past as if firsthand: through the treasuring of its relics, both private and public (souvenirs, heirlooms, exhibited artifacts); through the restoration and replication of structures and environments from the past (as at Williamsburg, Disneyland--or the U. Va. grounds); and through the fictional experiences offered by stories, novels, and movies set in the past.  Students will explore historical, psychological, and cultural contexts for these efforts, studying their similarities and differences, attempting to determine the sources and implications of this desire to re-live the past, and engaging some of the complex issues raised by that endeavor.  Throughout, the course will focus on sharpening the skills of analytical thinking and writing.  
ISHU 3183: Writing the Story of Your Life: Creative Nonfiction
Credits: 3
Student learns how to bring together the imaginative strategies of fictional story telling with new ways of narrating true, real-life events. Explores how Creative Nonfiction writing allows you to share your stories in compelling ways, helps you write effectively in professional and personal situations, and provides new ways for you to document real-life experiences as they occurred.
ISSS 3190: American Political Development
Credits: 3
Examines the history of American politics since the 1960's. Key areas of study include political factors that influence the way U.S. presidents design their domestic and foregin policy agenda, the role of opposing views from special interest groups and political parties in decision making, and critical decisions made by presidents from civil rights legislation to the Iraq and Afghanistan War and Obamacare and how they affect our daily lives.
ISLS 3190: Good Cop/Bad Cop
Credits: 3
This course examines the current use of the police power in a variety of situations, informed by the past and motivated by the future. Particular emphasis is on contemporary real-life examples to inform the discussion on the proper use of the police power. Those examples are subjected to a variety of perspectives, societal and individual, to gain a fuller understanding of the delicate balance of competing values. 
ISHU 3193: Writing About the Environment
Credits: 3
Focuses on classic, contemporary, and non-traditional literature about the environment. The course is divided into three sections: nature writing, place-based writing, and environmental writing. Readings focus on issues beyond landscape as gender, race, politics, ethics, and culture all play a part in environmental writing.
ISLS 3210: The Frost is Hard-Edged and Quick: Metaphor - Making a Final Unity
Credits: 3
What is a metaphor? What role does it play in the way we see the world, ourselves and others? What metaphors guide our own thinking - as a society and a culture about politics, crime, illness, ourselves, love and life? If we take metaphor seriously, is it possible to draw a hard line between fact and fiction, between arts and sciences, between the objective and subjective? Does metaphor refute reason? In this course students investigate these and related questions using a variety of media. Texts will be drawn from a spectrum of disciplines including poetry, cognitive psychology, linguistics, philosophy, literature and literary criticism.
ISLS 3211: Russian Politics
Credits: 3
Explores Russia's political themes of the 20th century, especially events since the fall of the Soviet Union. Includes Russia's tentative steps towards capitalism and democracy in the last two decades. Employs different analytical tools to craft an interdisciplinary portrait of Russia. Provides an opportunity to substantially improve critical thinking and basic academic writing.
ISLS 3212: From Beowulf to the Incredibles: Changing Heroes, Changing Cultures
Credits: 3
Explores heroic figures who play a critical part of understanding Western culture, literature, and wisdom. Analyzes literature and film to examine how heroic individuality has shaped western society, why we need heroes, and how our heroes are changing. Studies heroic tales compared to European and American history with an emphasis on critical thinking and analytical writing.
ISLS 3240: In Their Own Words: America
Credits: 3
Culture is made of the shared beliefs and experience of individuals, and the stories of the lives of those individuals both describe the culture and prescribe the direction in which it must move. The United States of America has a long series of disparate cultural histories; the purpose of this course is to use first-person narratives to unravel them.
ISLS 3250: The Notion and the Heft of Home
Credits: 3
Explores the myriad meanings of home through such questions as: is home a preposterous notion? Considers and analyzes personal definitions of home. Explores readings from sermons of Puritan New England to personal narrative of Native Americans to testimonials of the homeless.
ISHU 3251: Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop
Credits: 3
Explores the process, form, and voice of writing poetry. Offers the chance to read widely in contemporary American poetry and develop reflective prose essays on poetry, poetics, and the philosophy of poetry.
ISSS 3262: Globalization, Liberalism, and Reform in the 19th Century
Credits: 3
Surveys major trends in 19 century world history. Explores a representative sample of peoples and cultures of the period. Considers how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations. Introduces students to theoretical frameworks for world and comparative history. Explores the processes of cultural interaction and globalization. Introduces students to a broad range of sources.
ISBU 3281: The Art of Public Speaking
Credits: 3
Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.
ISSS 3281: The Art of Public Speaking
Credits: 3
Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.
ISHU 3281: The Art of Public Speaking
Credits: 3
Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.
ISHU 3290: Core Writing: The Basics of Analytical Writing
Credits: 3
Develops analytical writing skills needed to efficiently and effectively produce university research papers. Hones abilities in developing a thesis, handling contradictory evidence, organizing material, outlining, anticipating gaps in logic, and writing effectively and powerfully. Teaches grammar, usage, punctuation, avoiding plagiarism, and using MLA style book. Masters capabilities needed for the Capstone
ISLS 3295: U.S. History through the Virginia Experience
Credits: 3
Utilizes popular culture, archaeology, material culture, and traditional sources and methods to examine issues in American history as experienced by Virginians. Explores early contact, roots and development of American institutions and culture, the American Revolution, nation building, sectionalism, Civil War, Reconstruction, segregation, Civil Rights, and contemporary controversies.
ISLS 3300: The Poet in Society
Credits: 3
Explores the complex, historically-conditioned role of the poet in society as it has played out within two very different cultural traditions: the Western democratic tradition of free expression, as practiced in the U.S. and Western Europe, and the Russian/Soviet/East European tradition of the past century, in which censorship and repression of free speech has been the rule.
ISHU 3301: Introduction to Film
Credits: 3
Examines the cultural and commercial contexts of film production, including the directors, the intended audience, and the audience's response. Investigates film structure, how meaning is created, and how this structure can be read and understood. Examines genres, stories, and the ways in which films and their audiences are a part of the larger structure of the culture in which they exist.
ISHU 3304: The Films of Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock
Credits: 3
Studies the films of Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock, two very different but equally creative filmmakers who explored their medium with an intensive imagination. Analyzes such films as Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil, Vertigo, and Psycho, examining what makes them work and looking at the cultural and historical context of the films.
ISSS 3310: Popular Music's Vision of America
Credits: 3
Examines American popular music using Michael Billig's work Banal Nationalism. Helps students understand the day-to-day cultural scaffolding of their lives, and the larger narrative and ideological project of America. Contextualizes popular music's vision using sociological and literary contributions of the same era. Places American popular music within a wider parallel examination of America's post-Vietnam search for purpose and meaning.
ISHU 3310: Film, History, Politics, and Controversy
Credits: 3
Examines movie case studies that aroused controversy. Analyzes the messages these movies communicated on the screen. Considers what the filmmakers intended to communicate, and how audiences and media critics responded to the portrayals.
ISLS 3360: The Role of Memory and The Human Condition
Credits: 3
Focuses on the the human condition and uses literature to examine the role of memory.
ISSS 3360: Making Sense of the News
Credits: 3
Develops thoughtful and informed perspectives on some of the most intriguing news stories of our times. Examines aspects of current event topics. Students will have opportunities to share their discoveries and report their findings and judgments and discuss the relevant issues.
ISSS 3401: Smart Cities Enabling Sustainability
Credits: 3
Introduces smart cities within the context of sustainability: economic, environmental, and equity. Provides a multidisciplinary look at innovative smart city approaches to solve complex problems on the local level with global impact; includes topics from environmental studies, information technology, data science, engineering, and social science.
ISBU 3410: Commercial Law
Credits: 3
Surveys the American legal system and principles of constitutional, criminal, and tort law, emphasizing legal issues related to contracts, agency, corporations, and partnerships.
ISSS 3411: Personality Psychology: Theory and Application
Credits: 3
Surveys the major theoretical approaches to understanding the development, structure, and dynamics of personality. Covers classical psychoanalytical theories, trait theories, humanistic theories, social-cognitive, and biological and evolutionary theories. Presents methods of assessing and understanding the psychology of personality. Discusses the applications of personality theories in real life situations.
ISSS 3416: Social Psychology in The Modern World
Credits: 3
Examines major theories of social influence and human relations, with a focus on research methodologies and recent findings. Covers topics such as social cognition, self-concept, attitudes, persuasion, conformity, aggression, helping behavior, prejudice, and interpersonal relationships. Provides opportunities for students to critically examine the scientific literature and undertake research assignments to apply theory to modern societal issues.
ISSS 3420: Human Thought and Behavior
Credits: 3
Students will explore a variety of psychological topics in depth, from these major disciplines within psychology: Developmental, Social, Clinical, and Cognitive, and discuss their impact on the field of psychology and how they apply to behavior and life experience. Learning will be assessed by essay responses to questions posed from journal articles, book chapters, and class discussions and demonstrations.
ISSS 3422: Managing your Emotions in the Workplace
Credits: 3
Gives a fundamental overview of Emotional Intelligence and shows how understanding Emotional Intelligence leads to a beneficial working career and personal life. Presents an E.I. competence framework and reviews basic domains, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management through various methods to promote learning by doing. Applies theoretical concepts to real world situations.
ISSS 3440: Gender and Society
Credits: 3
Focuses on the social and cultural construction of gender differences and the ways in which gender norms and stereotypes are prescribed and reinforced for a societys members, depending on their sex. Explores the history of feminist thought and practice, while also attending to contemporary issues at the intersections of gender and race, nation, class, age and sexuality.
ISBU 3451: Fundamentals of Marketing
Credits: 3
Introduction to marketing principles and activities in both profit and non-profit enterprises, from the conception of goods and services to their consumption. Participants study consumer behavior as well as ethical, environmental, and international issues in marketing. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202 or equivalents, or instructor permission.
ISSS 3453: Food for Thought: An Exploration of the Way We Eat
Credits: 3
Looks at ways food has influenced western culture, and its significance in our lives from the invention of agriculture to the contemporary debate about health foods; examines films and texts to find womans role in food production, how religious beliefs, economic factors, and ideas about health influence why and what we eat. Should we live to eat or eat to live? Where do we eat? What forces shape our choice of foods? That's plenty to chew on!
ISHU 3456: History of Western Architecture from Antiquity to the Present
Credits: 3
Examines the tradition of Western architure from its inception in Greece and Rome to the present. Focuses on aesthetic, cultural, and political ideas framing the design, uses, and meanings of these celebrated buildings. Provides tools for visual analysis using a variety of methods from text anaylsis to visits of buildings.
ISHU 3457: Global Architecture
Credits: 3
Examines architecture from a global perspective. Focuses on aesthetic, cultural, and political forces that influence design, use, and meaning. Provides students with a vocabulary for discussing architecture as well as tools for visual analysis and interpretation.
ISHU 3500: Photography as Art
Credits: 3
Examines the tense but fruitful relationship between photography and art. Draws upon aesthetics, history, and criticism to explore controversies about photography as art, examine the impact of photography on artistic ideas and practices, and evaluate the importance of photography and art in modern culture.
ISLS 3610: Renaissance Art
Credits: 3
Explores Renaissance art in Europe beginning in the 13th century and continuing through the first decades of the 16th century. Considers materials, techniques, the aims of art-making, and artistic training. Examines through an evaluation of period texts the revival of Classicism in European art, architecture, and philosophy as well as the dynamics between artists, patrons, and institutions.
ISSS 3611: Cheap Eats: The Economics of the American Food Industry
Credits: 3
Examines the economic costs of food, including subsidies, production practices, ecological sustainability and health impacts; analyzes institutional factors contributing to potential market distortions in the food market system; evaluates the factors that characterize the current system such as the reliance on chemical pesticides and organic alternatives.
ISLS 3620: Ritual and Becoming in the Arts of Africa
Credits: 3
Examines the traditional arts produced on the African continent such as painting, sculpture, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, and body modification as they are incorporated into age-grade initiation, fertility ceremonies and curative rituals.
ISHU 3621: The Biological Basis for Art
Credits: 3
Investigates the idea of approaching art as a form of human evolution. Examines the art of several past and present cultures. Blends art and science to connect aesthetics to an understanding of human nature from the cognitive and biological sciences. Examines existing personal and cultural theories of art and art criticism.
ISHU 3623: Studio Art Seminar: Painting
Credits: 3
Introduces painting techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of its formal language and the fundamentals of artistic expression. Explores color theory, linear perspective, pictorial composition , figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills.
ISHU 3624: Visual Culture and Aesthetics: The Practice of Seeing
Credits: 3
Examines the cultural elements involved in the interactive process of defining and interpreting the meaning of visual images with regard to how art images are produced, consumed, and made meaningful. Explores images in art history and digital media to investigate the philosophical, social, and cultural influences which affect how we interpret and define the art experience.
ISHU 3626: Studio Art Seminar: Sculpture
Credits: 3
Immerses students immediately into the medium of sculptue through discussion and creation. Examines the history of sculpture from antiquity to the present through emphasis on contemporary sculpture. Observes the sculptural works of several artists including Duchamp, Brancusi, Judd, Smithson, Beuys, Hess, Nuaman, Goldsworthy, and many others the exploration of a wide variety of materials and techniques.
ISBU 3700: Financial Planning Strategies
Credits: 3
Covers income, money management, spending, credit, saving, and investing. Focuses on helping students organize their financial futures and expand their knowledge of various aspects of finance.
ISGE 3700: Financial Planning Strategies
Credits: 3
Covers income, money management, spending, credit, saving, and investing. Focuses on helping students organize their financial futures and expand their knowledge of various aspects of finance.
ISBU 3710: Managerial Finance
Credits: 3
Principles and practices of business finance focusing on managerial decision-making in financial policy. Topics include capital structure, types of securities and their use in raising funds, risk, valuation, and allocating resources for investment. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.
ISSS 3760: Issues in Leadership
Credits: 3
Designed to serve as an overview and exploration in the ever-growing field of leadership studies, the purpose of this course is to learn about leadership- to be better at leadership, whether in an organization, community, family, or some other context. A wide-range of topics and issues will be examined through historical and modern conceptions, case studies, moral and ethical sides of leadership, and focused looks at crisis leadership.
ISSS 3772: Global Leadership Fundamentals for All Industries
Credits: 3
Investigates current leadership thinking and behavior in for-profit and non-profit work environments, as well as the role leadership has played in past decision making processes, and what we can learn from the decisions that were made by those leaders. Examines real world examples throughout this course, leveraging the theory and practical applications of leadership.
ISLS 3780: An Examination of the Criminal Justice System
Credits: 3
Provides students with an overview and understanding of the criminal justice system as a social institution inside of the American institution. Enables students to gain an understanding of the various components of the criminal justice system and its responsibilities to include courts, corrections, and law enforcements.
PSHM 3805: Health Information Systems and Applications
Credits: 3
Introduces foundational knowledge and emerging trends in health informatics, and examines how information systems can be utilized to improve patient care, health outcomes, efficiency, and quality. Provides knowledge on how health informatics can enhance evidence-based decision making, cost-management, and performance; analyzes key issues in data management, and confidentiality in health informatics. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
ISSS 3810: The American Presidency
Credits: 3
This course addresses the constitutional role and historical development of the American Presidency. We will also examine the theoretical explanations of the institution's relationship to democratic government, the separation of powers, and the expansion of national administrative power. This broad understanding of the historical and theoretical presidency will inform our consideration of current events and upcoming presidential elections.
ISHU 3810: Ethical Issues
Credits: 3
Introduces the philosophical concept of the ethical discrimination of actions. Examines primary sources in some detail by presenting prevailing philosophical systems. Studies decision-making in the context of the contemporary world using examples such as business environment, faith and religion, and the political arena.
ISSS 3820: American National Identity
Credits: 3
Examines the character, origins, and evolution of American national identity. Positions the discussion in a wider theoretical landscape, designed to understand the nature of nations and nationalism. Explores the ways in which concepts of America and American have evolved over time, across space, and within social, cultural, and political contexts.
ISSS 3830: Critical Issues in American Foreign Policy
Credits: 3
Examines the critical foreign policy challenges facing the United States in the 21st century. Explores the principal challenges and opportunities for American policymakers, such as: the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental issues, and human rights and democratization.
ISBU 3840: International Business
Credits: 3
An introduction to the practice and theory of international business. Consideration given to global trade and economic integration theory; the major instruments and procedures needed for management and operation of an international business; modes of international market entry and foreign direct investment; strategies appropriate to managing an international business; global environmental issues; and the importance of culture and ethics in international business. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.
ISSS 3852: Innovation in Reluctant Organizations: Profiling in the FBI
Credits: 3
Examines paradigm innovation (when an organization upends basic assumptions about core organizational purposes) with particular emphasis on the ways policing has been resistant to innovation. Focuses on the introduction of psychological profiling as a tool to capture a new class of antisocial criminals. Centers discussion on Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to understand the success of profiling as an illuminating example.
ISSS 3870: Eportfolios in Undergraduate Education
Credits: 3
Engages students in inventorying their interdisciplinary and extracurricular experiences, and assembling a digital narrative and collection of artifacts (eportfolio). Presents foundational learning experience for students to develop writing, graphic composition, integrative, and self-reflective and -authorship skills. Guides students in developing autonomy and agency, as they produce digital representations of themselves and their achievements.
ISSS 3887: Educational Technology in the Information Age
Credits: 3
Focuses on ongoing societal debates over educational technology while exploring local technology resources available at UVa and on the Web in general. Explores web-based tools, information websites, and interactive databases that support communication, research, and design skills, as well as creativity and knowledge presentation in online environments.
ISSS 3888: Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology
Credits: 3
Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today's liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society. Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.
ISHU 3901: Dance: Anthropological Origins of Dance and Music in World Cultures
Credits: 3
Examines the anthropological origins of dance history in world cultures. Discusses the importance of dance to define and preserve the historic traditions within a culture. Explores the inherent relationship between dance and music within both the socio-cultural and folk aspects, as well as the ceremonial, religious, and ritual aspects of a culture.
ISCP 3991: Capstone Project I
Credits: 3
Explores the process of basic research and project design. Working with a faculty mentor, students develop a proposal for the Capstone Project. The completed proposal must be approved before students may register for ISCP 4991.
ISSS 4000: The Experience of the Great War: Life and Literature
Credits: 3
Drawing on histories and literature, including autobiographies, poetry, and novels, this course focuses on the experiences and mentalities of those who fought in World War I, as well as those who remained on the home front. The realities and myths of the Great War are explored. An emphasis is placed on British, French, and German writings about the Western Front as well as some consideration of the fighting on the Eastern Front and in Turkey.
ISSS 4005: Irregular Warfare: Terrorists, Insurgents, and Transnational Criminals
Credits: 3
Analyzes how non-state actors such as terrorists, insurgents, and transnational criminals conduct irregular warfare to subvert or overthrow the State and control populations. Examines strategies to stop them by exploring recent and historical case studies, with a special focus on modern conflicts and movements
ISSS 4010: The Second World War: Experience of Total War
Credits: 3
Covers military, political, social and economic aspects of history's most devastating conflict. Explores the experiences of military personnel and civilians in Europe and Asia.
ISHU 4010: The Performing Arts: Myth, Mysticism, and Merriment
Credits: 3
Examines the history of western culture through the history of the performing arts, beginning with plays of ancient Greece and ending with musicals of twentieth-century Broadway and Hollywood. Examines different works of art in order to discover what they can tell about the aspirations, fears, and basic conflicts of the societies from which they emerged.
PSHM 4020: Management of Health Care Organizations
Credits: 3
Provides an overview of the management and leadership theories, models and practices used to improve the operations and performance of health care organizations. Students will enhance their ability to analyze the problems of health care organizations and develop strategies to improve decision-making, performance, and quality in health care. Prerequisite: Completion of PSHM 3010
PSHM 4050: Understanding Diversity in Health Care
Credits: 2
Prepares students to understand the importance of providing culturally appropriate care to diverse populations, and introduces students to the systematic as well as disciplined approaches used to incorporate diversity management and cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare. Explores relevant organizational dynamics and organizational policies that are necessary to effectively manage a healthcare organization.
ISSS 4050: American Society and War from Vietnam to the War in Iraq
Credits: 3
Focuses on policymakers and public reaction to the War in Vietnam, the 1st and 2nd Gulf Wars and our ongoing War in Afghanistan. Discusses how student demonstrations against the Vietnam War changed our society leading to new laws. Compares and contrasts the various causes of these wars, how America responded, the role of the military and the media during these wars. Examines the role of the President and Congress in conducting these wars.
PSHM 4052: Global Health Care
Credits: 2
Introduces key concepts of health care in a global context, including the impact of cultural and economic forces influencing health care access in developed and developing nations. Appraises and explores different systems and logistical issues in health care delivery; identifies international actors and roles in health and humanitarian action. Prequisites: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program; and completion of PSHM 3010
ISSS 4060: War and World Politics
Credits: 3
Explores the causes of war, evolution and advances in military strategy, historical case studies, and contemporary issues of nuclear weapons, humanitarian war, and war against terrorism through major scholarly works, primary documents, films, class discussions, papers, and lectures.
ISSS 4062: Introduction to International Politics
Credits: 3
Develops methods, examines issues, and discusses the roles of various actors in world politics. Examines the international system and analyzes the crisis of the Westphalian State System. Provides understanding of conflicts, foreign policy, power, security, alliances, deterrence, bargaining, cooperation, globalization, institutions, and law in international politics.
ISHU 4090: Writing: Comfortable as a Hearth Rug
Credits: 3
Writing begins with intuition, moves towards consciousness and strives for clarity. Such movement calls for a steady eye and an enduring approach. Accordingly, this course focuses upon resurrecting the fading art of patience, a faculty required for writing. Students will read widely, respond to assigned readings through weekly essays and share work in a workshop setting with an emphasis on revision. Writing intensive.
ISHU 4120: The American Short Story: The Writer and Tradition
Credits: 3
This course examines the American short story from the perspective of the both reader and writer. Defining recurrent themes and conventions of the genre by reading major stories spanning the last 200 years of American literature, students explore the importance of tradition to the writer analytically in critical essays and experientially in their own short stories.
ISHU 4130: Film Noir
Credits: 3
Focuses on the genre of film noir, styles noir has brought into mainsteam cinema, themes, and characters throughout the genre. Includes class, gender, and the historical context of noir.
ISSS 4131: Mental Health Disorders of Modern Society
Credits: 3
Introduces students to psychological disorders and mental health concerns prevalent in today's society via memoirs and classic texts from psychological literature. Examines the symptoms of each disorder. Explores common misperceptions related to the disorders and current treatment options. Includes discussion and familiarization with available resources.
ISHU 4180: The Nature of the Hero and How to Create One
Credits: 3
Focuses on plot, point of view, discovery of theme, recognition and reversal, and writing in scene, for writers of fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and memoir. Creates an understanding of how stories are shaped and told. Explores Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey, which distills the stories told in every culture into a framework for one's own story.
ISHU 4190: Writing Strategies
Credits: 3
Explores non-fiction writing. Develops and hones skills needed to write stories and essays that readers are compelled to read. Learn the power of personal narrative and begin to grasp how that power affects a reader by understanding the difference between 'telling' and 'showing'.
PSHM 4200: Women's Health Issues: Access, Treatment and Policy
Credits: 3
Approaches issues related to women, gender, and health from various interdisciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Examines the role of the medical profession, public health professionals, activists and social institutions in constructing discourses and knowledge about women and health; emphasizes the biological, social, economic, behavioral, and political factors associated with women's health. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
ISSS 4290: An Alternative History of Early America
Credits: 3
Examine America's colonial period (to the eve of the American Revolution) as that of a foreign country. Investigates the people, cultures, institutions, and events of the period on their own terms rather than through the lens of modern America. Uncovers the origins of many later American issues and debates;freedom and slavery; warfare; religion and revival; sectionalism; race; class; and commercialism.
ISSS 4292: Liberalism and Conservatism in Modern America
Credits: 3
Examines the fundamental clashes between liberals and conservatives, including how this split in perspectives developed our modern culture. Focuses on a tolerant, open-minded, and balanced investigation that seeks a broader understanding and appreciation of these diverse perspectives.
ISSS 4300: America in the 1960's: A Decade of Turbulence
Credits: 3
Examines the issues of ideology, race, gender, faith, war, the youth movement, as well as the politics of the Great Society social programs and voting rights. Explores music, the draft, and the counter culture, including a new conservatism also present amidst the violence at home and abroad.
PSHM 4300: Introduction to Population Health: Programs, Policy & Epidemiology
Credits: 3
Examines health issues from a population health perspective of policy and programs; introduces students to principles of population health practice with emphasis on history, philosophy and scope. Examines how health care delivery systems, public health agencies and community organizations work together to develop interventions to improve the health outcomes in the various communities they serve. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
ISHU 4350: The Films of Stanley Kubrick
Credits: 3
Explores the films of Stanley Kubrick and the times in which they were made. Investigates Kubrick as a means to understanding film. Examines how films are to be read, how they tell their stories, how they fit into their historical and cultural moment.
PSHM 4400: Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences
Credits: 3
Provides an intro to the research process for the allied healthcare professional. The purpose, conduct and eval. of research will be discussed using examples from the health sciences literature. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess the skills to propose and present a basic health sciences research proposal and critically eval. the sources and substance of health related sources and literature. Prereq: PSHM 3010 & PSHM 3050
ISSS 4420: Speaking with Numbers: The Effective Use of Statistics
Credits: 3
Provides a basis for evaluating the claims of others while also choosing the best analysis methods for supporting ideas. Examines how quantitative analysis can inform decisions, how to select the appropriate tools for the situation, how to interpret the results, and how to effectively communicate the results.
ISSS 4430: Topics in Developmental Psychology
Credits: 3
Focuses on the development of perception, cognition, language, personality, and social interaction. Considers perspectives and methods in developmental research; encourages students to think critically about the assumptions and methods that underlie research on particular issues.
ISSS 4431: Topics in Cognitive Psychology
Credits: 3
Examines the theoretical bases for the study of thinking, consciousness, and the mind, with a focus on current research findings. Topics include learning and memory, language, reasoning, decision-making and cognitive neuropsychology. Challenges students to design a small-scale experiment and connect their findings to applications in professional, personal, or education contexts.
ISSS 4454: Emotion, Emotional Intelligence, and Meditation
Credits: 3
Examines the neurological basis of emotion and the content of emotional intelligence which includes social competence in relationships, impulse control, empathy and compassion, resilience, motivation, and optimism. Discusses the underlying neurological mechanisms through which mindfulness meditation exerts its impact on emotion regulation and emotional intelligence.
ISSS 4455: Social Inequality
Credits: 3
This course explores systems of social inequality: feudalism, caste and slavery, class, and status groups, primarily in American society, but with reference to Europe and the Indian sub-continent as well. Starting with the fundamental concepts of Karl Marx and Max Weber, students will discuss the theoretical constructs that define systems of inequality, consider some historical examples, and then examine "social stratification" in our own country. Does the United States have a class system? If so, what are its characteristics? Joining the scholarly debate on this issue, students will consider the meaning of equal opportunity and social mobility for achieving the "American dream." The course also explores the empirical consequences of social inequality for every day life: in health and wellness, housing, education, and family structure.
ISSS 4456: Russian-American Relations
Credits: 3
Focuses on the post-1945 period and the evolution of Russian-American relations since the fall of the Soviet Union, through an interdisciplinary lense based on contributions from international relations scholars and practitioners as well as historians, economists, philosophers, and political psychologists in historical and contemporary perspectives.
ISSS 4458: The Cold War
Credits: 3
This course examines both Russian and American foreign policy at several critical points during the conflict. Through major scholarly works, primary documents, films, class discussions, papers, and lectures students will work together to better understand the Cold War and gain a fuller understanding of its political, military, cultural, economic, and ideological impact at home and abroad. The following questions will be explored: 1) How did the Cold War start?; 2) What were some of the important decisions made during the conflict, and why?; 3) Why did the Cold War end the way it did?
ISIN 4510: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Social Sciences
Credits: 3
Introduces students to methodologies, content areas, and contributions of social sciences. Provides students with framework for studying and articulating arguments in the social sciences. Students learn similarities among social science disciplines and what differentiates them from the humanities and sciences.
ISIN 4520: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Humanities
Credits: 3
Introduces students to methodologies, content areas, and contributions of humanities. Provides students with framework for studying and articulating arguments in the humanities. Students learn similarities among humanities disciplines and what differentiates them from the social sciences and sciences.
PSHM 4600: Service Excellence in Health Care: Quality Improvement & Customer Service
Credits: 3
Explores the concepts and organizational factors that impact service delivery and quality in health care. It emphasizes service excellence and resources to improve customer service and quality of services. It will also focus on the concepts, theories, practices, tools, and strategies for quality improvement and quality management in health care organizations and in service delivery. Prerequisite: Completion of PSHM 3010
ISSS 4610: Economics of Climate Change
Credits: 3
Examines all aspects of global warming, emphasizing appropriate government policies such as carbon taxes, cap and trade systems, and clean technologies to limit future carbon emissions. Provides students with economic backround and tools to address the public policy issues related to climate change.
PSHM 4650: American Health Care: Challenges and Opportunities
Credits: 3
Provides foundational overview of the structure and function of the US health care system. Promotes critical discussion of history and current status of organizations and delivery systems. Examines challenges facing providers, patients, and policy makers, as health care becomes more complex. Utilizes current events and media to explore controversies related to labor, finance, access, and health disparities. Req: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
ISSS 4670: Organizational Change and Development
Credits: 3
Explores system theories, organizational structure and design, organizational culture, organizational diagnosis, and several basic frames of reference for understanding change.
ISBU 4670: Organizational Change and Development
Credits: 3
This course is designed to equip anyone who has a role to play in organizational change (employees and associates at all levels, supervisors and managers, information technology consultants, and a variety of organizational stakeholders) with the basic tools required to analyze change and its consequences.
ISBU 4680: Entrepreneurship
Credits: 3
Explores the process of creating and managing new ventures. Studies how to evaluate new opportunities, the early growth of the enterprise, the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, and venture capital investment.
PSHM 4700: Economics and Finance of Health Care
Credits: 3
Provides basic overview of economic and financial management concepts in health care. Introduces important economic concepts and issues in health care including market factors, production, costs, labor issues, and economic evaluation. Provides an overview of basic financial management principles, capital planning, financial statements, and budgeting in health care organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
PSHM 4750: Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Health Care
Credits: 3
Provides a comprehensive analysis of individual and group behavior in organizations, and an understanding of how organizations can be managed more effectively and enhance the quality of employees' work life. Through the examination of leadership topics, explores the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in a diverse healthcare environment in a variety of situations. Prerequisites: Admission to BPHM Program; and completion of PSHM 3010
PSHM 4800: Health Sciences Management Internship I
Credits: 2
Provides opportunity for students to apply knowledge & skills in health care management, administration, research and policy in real-world health care setting. Exposes students to other health care organizations & professionals, and various pressures that affect decision-making in the field. Challenges students to identify and develop new skills, alongside their personal career path & goals. Prerequisite: Final year of BPHM Program.
PSHM 4801: Health Sciences Management Internship II
Credits: 1
Provides opportunity for students to apply knowledge & skills in health care management, administration, research and policy in real-world health care setting. Exposes students to other health care organizations & professionals, and various pressures that affect decision-making in the field. Challenges students to identify and develop new skills, alongside their personal career path & goals. Prerequisite: Final year of BPHM Program.
ISSS 4820: American Political Thought and Institutions
Credits: 3
This course analyzes America's governing institutions (including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and political parties) through the political thought that informs American constitutionalism. This course, then, is about political ideas as they have appeared and developed in the United States and the manner in which they have influenced and shaped the development of governing institutions. Particular attention will be paid to how these institutions interact, overlap, and intersect.
ISHU 4850: Principles of Sustainability
Credits: 3
Provides an introduction to sustainability concepts within the framework of environment, economics, and equity. Covers foundational principles of sustainability and emerging topics, including population, energy, food, water and technology. Emphasizes the interrelationship between humans and the environment, and includes discussion of ecosystems, human behavior, ethics, and policy.
PSHM 4900: Capstone I: Development of the Health Sciences Management Project
Credits: 2
Introduces the development of the health sciences management capstone project; students select a relevant project or research question and a focused topic of investigation, conduct a comprehensive literature reivew of the topic, engage with a project mentor, plan out the research project and complete a capstone project proposal. Prerequisites: Completion of PSHM 4400.
PSHM 4950: Capstone II: Health Sciences Management Project Implementation
Credits: 2
Focuses on the successful completion of the student's capstone project proposed in PSHM 4900 Capstone Course I. Integrates the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in the BPHM degree program and applies them to a problem or opportunity for improvement in the healthcare management field. Students conduct a project in a real world healthcare management setting. Prerequisite: PSHM 4900
ISCP 4991: Capstone Project II
Credits: 3
Students design, develop, produce, and evaluate a semester-long project that synthesizes their educational experiences and professional interests. Done individually or occasionally in teams and supervised by a faculty mentor, the proposal for the project must be approved before students may register for this course. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ISCP 3991, Capstone Project I.
ISSS 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent Study for students working on Capstone Proposals and Proseminar work.
ISHU 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent Study for students working on Capstone Proposals and Proseminar work.
PSHM 5010: Health Care Management: Applying Concepts to Practice
Credits: 3
Provides introduction to healthcare management to promote competency development in the field. Integrates theory and practice through course presentations, readings, online discussions, experiential exercises, case studies and written assignments. Emphasizes the application of critical thinking, problem solving and design skills within multidisciplinary environment to healthcare practice. Prereq: Bachelor's Degree
PSHM 5020: Management of Health Care Organizations
Credits: 3
Focuses on the management concepts, theories, responsibilities, functions, and leadership skills for managers in health care organizations (HCOs). Students will evaluate and analyze health care operations, the health care environment, and issues in management and leadership. Students will apply managerial skills and strategies to improve performance, quality and decision-making in HCOs.
PSHM 5080: Legal and Ethical Decision-Making in Health Care
Credits: 3
Focuses on principles & theories of law related to healthcare delivery, management & administration. Examines the application of laws on healthcare liability prevention & the risks managers face. Explores legal & ethical issues in healthcare systems; and investigates the healthcare administrator as decision-maker, leader and moral agent. Evaluates situations with potential ethical/legal implications.
PSHM 5300: Population Health: Programs, Policy, and Epidemiology
Credits: 3
Focuses on the unique integration of public health and healthcare systems. Provides students with key knowledge and skills to effectively promote health and prevent disease, while navigating public health and healthcare challenges. Emphasizes the identification of populations at risk; evidence-based care, care coordination, patient and community engagement, and reporting of outcomes. Prereq: Bachelor's Degree
PSHM 5600: Service Excellence in Health Care: Quality Improvement & Customer Service
Credits: 3
Explores the concepts and organizational factors impacting service delivery and quality management in health care; examines service excellence processes/resources to improve customer service and quality. Applies strategies to address challenges in quality and service management; focuses on the concepts, theories, and applications to improve decision making in quality and customer service. Prerequisite: Admission to HSM Grad Certificate Program.
PSHM 5650: American Health Care: Challenges and Opportunities
Credits: 3
Provides foundational overview of the structure/function of US health care system including challenges and opportunities to develop competence in healthcare management, promotes critical discussion of history and current status of healthcare delivery systems. Examines challenges facing providers, patients and policy makers, and uses current events to explore healthcare controversies. Prerequisite: Admission to the HSM Graduate Certificate.
PSHM 5700: Economics and Finance of Health Care
Credits: 3
Provides basic overview of economic and financial management concepts in health care. Introduces important economic concepts and issues in health care, including market factors, production, costs, labor issues, and economic evaluation. Provides an overview of basic financial management principles, capital planning and financing, financial statements, and budgeting in health care organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to Grad Certificate Program.
PSHM 5750: Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Health Care
Credits: 3
Moves through individual, group, and organizational levels of behavior, drawing on concepts and practices from the field of Organizational Behavior (OB). Provides a basic understanding of one's own and others' behavior, particularly in teams, and enhances students' ability to communicate and work effectively with others, including core leadership skills. Prerequisites: Admission to HSM Graduate Certificate; and completion of PSHM 5010 or 5020.
PSHM 5805: Health Information Systems and Applications
Credits: 3
Examines how informatics in the health care industry improves patient care, health outcomes, efficiency, quality & evidence-based decision making; evaluates challenges and strategies for health care managers in implementing health information systems & their costs, benefits, and impacts in health care organizations. Analyzes key issues in data management, security, privacy and confidentiality. Prerequisite: Admission to HSM Graduate Certificate