Shu Man Fu headshot
SF

Shu Man Fu

Professor
Unit: School of Medicine
Department: Department of Medicine, Rheumatology
Office location and address
21 Hospital Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Residency, Internal Medicine, Stanford University
MD, Stanford Medical School
PhD, Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Biography

As a medical student and house staff at Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford University Hospital, I was exposed to research in immunology and systemic lupus erythematosus. As a student and faculty member associated with the late Dr. Henry Kunkel at the Rockefeller University, I was deeply involved in various aspects of human immunological research. During this period, I continued to care for a few patients with SLE (lupus) and was instrumental in organizing the serum bank in the laboratory. I was primarily responsible for the mapping of the C2 gene (the second complement component) within the MHC. I was involved in the identification of the two chain structures of the HLA-DR molecule and the generation of the homozygous cell line for typing of the HLA-D region.

I also developed an interest in the role of MHC as a disease susceptibility gene in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), SLE and rheumatoid arthritis. At the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF), I collaborated with Dr. M. Reichlin and Dr. J. Harley to study the linkage of HLA-D region genes to autoantibody production.

During the past 15 years, I have adopted NZM2328 as a lupus-nephritis model and have done extensive studies on the mechanisms of autoantibody diversification. We have demonstrated endogenous autoantigens play a crucial role on epitope spreading at the B cell level. This process involved autoreactive T cells to various T cell epitopes within the autoantigen of interest. From these studies, we have gained great insight into the role of crossreactive T cells to autoantigens and conventional environmental antigens in the induction of an autoimmune response to SmD and its peptides.

Cellular and Genetic Basis of Systemic Lupus (5R01ARO47988-15)
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal &
April 22, 2016 – March 31, 2022
MD-INMD Targeting Treg for Therapy of Lupus Glomerulonephritis
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidne
March 01, 2016 – February 29, 2020
MD-INMD Local Factors Contributing to Pathogenesis of Proliferative Lupus Nephritis
Source: Lupus Research Alliance
January 01, 2017 – October 31, 2019
MD-INMD IL-2 and IL-33 as Therapeutic Agents for Lupus Nephritis
Source: Alliance for Lupus Research
February 01, 2015 – January 31, 2018
Cellular and Genetic Basis of Systemic Lupus
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal &
August 01, 2010 – April 21, 2016
HLA-D Region in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pathogenesis
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal &
April 01, 2011 – March 31, 2016
T Cell Epitope Mimicry for Autoimmune Responses in SLE
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Allergy & Infectious Disease
July 16, 2009 – June 30, 2014
Progressions and Biomarkers of Proliferative Lupus Nephritis
Source: Alliance for Lupus Research
February 25, 2011 – February 28, 2014