Stephen Cushman headshot
SC

Stephen B. Cushman

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of English
Office location and address
441 Bryan Hall
201 Cabell Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Education
Ph.D. Yale, 1982
M.Phil. Yale, 1981
M.A. Yale, 1980
B.A. Cornell, 1978
INST 1550: Interdisciplinary Studies-Student Initiated Courses
Credits: 1–3
With sponsorship and supervision by a faculty member and approval of the Dean's Office, acting for the Committee on Educational Programs and the Curriculum, students may initiate a course in which they provide the instruction. The grade is determined by the faculty member. These courses count as "outside the College." Students in the College may offer no more than 3.0 credits for the B.A. or B.S. Consult the INST course web page at http://www.uvastudentcouncil.com/student-services/initiatives/cavalier-education-program/ (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.
ENGL 2559: New Course in Introduction to English Literature
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of English Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3730: American Literature of the Twentieth Century
Credits: 3
Studies the major poetry and fiction. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3820: History of Literatures in English II
Credits: 3
A two-semester, chronological survey of literatures in English from their beginnings to the present day. Studies the formal and thematic features of different genres in relation to the chief literary, social, and cultural influences upon them. ENGL 3810 covers the period up to 1800; ENGL 3820, the period 1800 to the present. Required of all majors. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu.
LPPL 4225: Leadership and Practice
Credits: 2
In this seminar, the Meriwether Lewis Institute 3rd year cohort focuses its effort both on measurable impact on the University and personal growth as a leader. Using their project proposals as the vehicles for collective impact and personal growth, students will develop & advance their proposals, analyze course readings, engage one another on project challenges, and begin translating the leadership skills they are learning to the broader world.
PPOL 4225: Leadership and Practice
Credits: 2
In this seminar, the Meriwether Lewis Institute 3rd year cohort focuses its effort both on measurable impact on the University and personal growth as a leader. Using their project proposals as the vehicles for collective impact and personal growth, students will develop & advance their proposals, analyze course readings, engage one another on project challenges, and begin translating the leadership skills they are learning to the broader world.
HIUS 4260: Voices of the Civil War
Credits: 3
This course uses the writings of participants to examine major themes relating to the American Civil War. Assigned texts will illuminate, among other topics: (1) Why the war came; (2) How it evolved from a struggle for Union to one for Union and emancipation; (3) How the conflict affected civilians on both sides; (4) Why soldiers fought; and (5) How men and women on each side remembered the war and how those memories influence current perceptions.
PAVS 4500: Pavilion Seminar
Credits: 3
The Pavilion Seminars are open, by instructor permission, to 3rd and 4th year students. They are 3-credit, multidisciplinary seminars, focused on big topics and limited to max. 15 students each. For detailed descriptions of current offerings, see http://college.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/PAVS.
ENAM 4500: Advanced Studies in American Literature
Credits: 3
Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENSP 4800: The Bible
Credits: 3
Analyzes readings in the English Bible. Designed to familiarize or re-familiarize the literary student with the shape, argument, rhetoric, and purposes of the canon; with the persons, events, and perspectives of the major narratives; and with the conventions, techniques, resources, and peculiarities of the texts. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENPW 4820: Poetry Program Poetics
Credits: 3
This poetics seminar, designed for students in the English Department's Area program in Poetry Writing but open to other students on a space-available basis, is a close readings course for serious makers and readers of poems. Seminar topics vary by semester. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 4900: The Bible
Credits: 3
Analyzes readings in the English Bible. Designed to familiarize or re-familiarize the literary student with the shape, argument, rhetoric, and purposes of the canon; with the persons, events, and perspectives of the major narratives; and with the conventions, techniques, resources, and peculiarities of the texts. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: third year, fourth year, English major or minor, AAS major or minor.
ENGL 5559: New Course in English Literature
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of English Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 5830: Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
Credits: 3
An interdisciplinary course that includes the following elements: studies in the textual traditions of particular religions; studies in literary theory; studies in literary traditions; the application of literary theory to studies in religious text traditions; and the application of the history of religions to the study of literary canons.
ENCR 8559: New Course in Criticism
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Criticism. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
  • State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award, 2015
  • Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professor, 2014-2016
  • Fellow, Virginia Center for the Humanities, 1997
  • Mayo Distinguished Teaching Professor, 1994-1997
  • Fulbright Lecturer, Greece, 1993
  • All-University Teaching Award, 1992
  • Fellow, American Council of Learned Societies, 1986-1987