RM

Rachel Miller

Associate Director, Summer and Special Academic Programs
Unit: Provost's Office
Department: Summer Session Office
Office location and address
102 Amphitheater Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
PV-Theresa Neil Memorial Research Fund
Source: Theresa Neil Memorial Research Fund
June 01, 2011 – August 31, 2013
LASE 150: Special Topics in the Liberal Arts
Special Topics in the Liberal Arts.
INST 900: Summer Undergraduate Research
For students doing approved undergraduate research in Summer Session
ESL 913: Academic Communications Seminar for Researchers- Oral Skills
This course is an advanced oral communication course designed for researchers, fellows, and visiting faculty at the University. Participants learn and practice strategies to enhance oral communication with colleagues and professional contacts, gaining skills in conversing with individuals & groups and giving presentations. Available in a one-on-one format, 2 hours/week plus one hour/week of structured practice for 6 weeks. Program fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
ARTH 1051: History of Art I
Credits: 4
A survey of the great monuments of art and architecture from their beginnings in caves through the arts of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval western Europe. The course attempts to make art accessible to students with no background in the subject, and it explains the ways in which painting, sculpture, and architecture are related to mythology, religion, politics, literature, and daily life. The course serves as a visual introduction to the history of the West.
STAT 1100: Chance: An Introduction to Statistics
Credits: 3
Studies introductory statistics and probability, visual methods for summarizing quantitative information, basic experimental design and sampling methods, ethics and experimentation, causation, and interpretation of statistical analyzes. Applications use data drawn from current scientific and medical journals, newspaper articles, and the Internet. Students will not receive credit for both STAT 1100 and STAT 1120.
INST 1500: Interdisciplinary Studies
Credits: 1–3
Individual faculty may teach these courses with the approval of the Dean's Office, which acts for the Committee on Education Policy and the Curriculum. A maximum of 3.0 credits count toward the B.A. or B.S. in the College. INST courses count as non-College credits.
HIST 1501: Introductory Seminar in History
Credits: 3
Introduction to the study of history intended for first- and second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
ARTS 1559: New Course in Studio Art
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of studio art.
XHOS 1559: New Class in Xhosa
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Xhosa language or literature.
ITAL 2010: Intermediate Italian I
Credits: 3
Continued grammar, conversation, composition, readings, and an introduction to Italian literature. Prerequisite: ITAL 1020 or the equivalent. Note: The following courses have the prerequisite ITAL 2010, 2020, or permission of the department.
STAT 2020: Statistics for Biologists
Credits: 4
This course includes a basic treatment of probability, and covers inference for one and two populations, including both hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. Analysis of variance and linear regression are also covered. Applications are drawn from biology and medicine.
ITAL 2020: Intermediate Italian II
Credits: 3
Continuation of ITAL 2010.
ARTH 2054: Roman Art and Archaeology
Credits: 3–4
Following an overview of Etruscan art, the course examines the development of Roman architecture, urbanism, sculpture and painting from the Republic to Constantine. A focus is Rome itself, but other archaeological sites, such as Pompeii, in Italy and throughout the empire are also considered. Themes, such as succession, the achievements of the emperor, the political and social role of art, and the dissolution of classical art, are traced.
BIOL 2100: Introduction to Biology with Laboratory: Cell Biology & Genetics
Credits: 4
BIOL 2100 is one of two semester courses that together provide an intensive introduction to biology for prospective Biology majors and pre-health (med, vet, dental) students. This course focuses on the fundamentals of cell biology and genetics with an emphasis on classical and modern experimental approaches. Lecture topics and concepts are reinforced and extended during once-weekly laboratory/small group discussions.
DRAM 2440: Theatre Abroad: Performance
Credits: 3
This course focuses on basic performance techniques as well as individual and group skills. It develops a vocabulary of acting techniques through improvisation, performance exercises and monologue and/or scene work. In addition, the course encourages students to develop skills in personal presentation, confidence building, and teamwork, which transcends the acting studio and has a direct application in life and the workplace.
PLCP 2500: Special Topics in Comparative Politics
Credits: 1–6
Special Topics in Comparative Politics.
PLPT 2500: Special Topics in Political Theory
Credits: 3
Special Topics in Political Theory
DRAM 2559: New Course in Drama
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of drama.
GSGS 2559: New Course in Global Studies
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Studies.
BIOL 3000: Cell Biology
Credits: 3
Examines the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell biology at the molecular level. Topics will include: structure and function of the plasma membrane, transport of small molecules, ions and macromolecular complexes across membranes, protein trafficking, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathways , and the control of cell division and cellular proliferation. Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and any two of the following classes CHEM 1410, 1420, 1810 & 1820. BIOL 3000 is not repeatable.
ITAL 3010: Advanced Italian I
Credits: 3
Includes idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings of literary texts in Italian, plus a variety of oral exercises including presentations, skits, and debates. Italian composition is emphasized through writing assignments and selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: ITAL 2020.
BIOL 3010: Genetics and Molecular Biology
Credits: 3
What makes humans different from fruit flies? Why does your brain have neurons and not liver cells? This course is all about the answer to these questions: It's the genes! This course covers the chemical make-up of genes, how they're passed on through generations, how they're expressed and how that expression is regulated, how disruption in the structure and expression of genes arise and how those disruptions lead to cellular defects and disease. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and either CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1810 or CHEM 1610. BIOL 3010 is not repeatable.
BIOL 3020: Evolution and Ecology
Credits: 3
Examines the mechanisms of evolutionary change, with an emphasis on the genetic and evolutionary principles needed to understand the diversification of life on earth.  Covers the ecology of individuals and population dynamics.  Major topics include the genetics and ecology of natural populations, adaptation, molecular evolution and macroevolution, and the application of evolutionary and ecological concepts to conservation biology.  Required for all Biology majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2200 or BIOL 2020. BIOL 3020 is not repeatable.
BIOL 3030: Biochemistry
Credits: 3
Biochemistry underlies nearly every biological process, from environmental science to medicine. When living systems are in chemical and energetic balance, organisms thrive. When they're out of balance, as in disease or unpredictable environments, life is compromised. This course will explain how simple chemical and physical principles apply to the major classes of biological macromolecules that maintain life. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040 and either CHEM 2410 or CHEM 1820
ITAL 3040: Advanced Italian III
Credits: 3
This course aims at perfecting student's command of Italian language, in all major skill areas: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Idiomatic Italian conversation promoted via readings and discussions in Italian on current subjects. Writing proficiency promoted through composition work. In Italian. Prerequisites: Completion of ITAL 2020 or its equivalent.
SPAN 3050: Spanish for Medical Professionals
Credits: 3
This course is designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who want to develop fundamental written and oral skills and vocabulary for the assessment of Spanish speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will gain familiarity with non-technical and semi-technical functional vocabulary, along with idiomatic expressions and situational phrases that are used in medical Spanish.
ITAL 3050: Advanced Italian IV
Credits: 3
Continued perfection of Italian language proficiency, in all major skill areas: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Idiomatic Italian conversation promoted via readings and discussions in Italian on current subjects. Writing proficiency promoted through composition work. In Italian. Prerequisites: Completion of ITAL 3040 or its equivalent.
BIOL 3230: Animal Physiology
Credits: 3
Focuses on selected vertebrate organ systems; considers other systems where relevant. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020.
ENGL 3300: English Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century
Credits: 3
Surveys representative writers, themes, and forms of the period 1660-1800. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
BIOL 3400: Functional Morphology of Vertebrates
Credits: 4
Comparative investigations of functional morphology across major vertebrate lineages.  Lectures are organized into three units; 1) evolutionary history and patterns of development, 2) integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems, and 3) sensory systems, and neural and endocrine integrations.  Topics of investigation focus on biomechanical and physiological performance of biological structures, from cells to organ systems, and on the origins and diversification of form-function complexes among vertebrates.  Lab exercises include dissections, observation of prepared specimens and other material, and modeling/simulation of biomechanical systems.  This course serves as a 3000-level lab requirement for either the B.A. or B.S. in biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2040.
BIOL 3450: Biodiversity and Conservation
Credits: 3
Introduction to the fundamental principles of conservation biology (e.g., global species numbers, value of biodiversity, causes of extinction, genetic diversity, island biogeography, priority setting) and current topics of debate (including zoo versus field conservation, effects of global change on species extinction). Conservation case studies will allow students to judge the relevance of biological theory to practical problems in conservation.
PSYC 3500: Special Topics in Psychology
Credits: 3
Seminars on special and current topics in psychology.
ZFOR 3503: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3506: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3508: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3509: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3512: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ENGL 3515: Medieval European Literature in Translation
Credits: 3
Explores themes in English, French, German, Italian, Irish, Icelandic, and Spanish literature of the Middle Ages. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ARTH 3525: Topics in Renaissance Art History
Credits: 3–4
Examines focused topics in Renaissance Art History.
GSGS 3559: New Course in Global Studies
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Studies.
LASE 3559: New Course in the Liberal Arts
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to explore a range of topics in the liberal arts and sciences.
HIEU 3851: History of London
Credits: 3
History of London
BIOL 4320: Signal Transduction: How cells talk to each other
Credits: 3
This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010
BIOL 4410: Molecular Biology and Genetics
Credits: 3
A survey of contemporary issues in molecular biology and genetics. The course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature emphasizing the development of critical reading techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000, 3010
ARAH 5753: Southern History and Material Culture
Credits: 3
Southern History & Material Culture is an intensive graduate-level introduction to the decorative arts, history and material culture of the American South. The four-week course includes a number of lectures, collection studies and workshops by members of the staff of the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Old Salem, Inc., the faculty of the University of Virginia, and guest scholars.
PVNC 8000: Student Health Internship
Student Health Internship