Robert Cox headshot
RC

Robert Michael Cox

Associate Professor
Director of Graduate Studies
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Biology
Office location and address
075 Gilmer Hall
485 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.A., College of the Holy Cross, 1999
Ph.D., Rutgers University, 2005
Collaborative Proposal: Evolutionary reversals in hormonal modulation of growth-regulatory gene networks
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
September 01, 2018 – August 31, 2021
AS-BIOL CAREER: Two Phenotypes, One Genome: Genomic conflict as a Research Framework for Professional Development of Science Educators
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Biological Sciences
March 15, 2015 – February 29, 2020
AS-BIOL Dissertation Research: Revealing the genomic targets of intralocus sexual conflict
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Biological Sciences
June 01, 2016 – May 31, 2018
AS-BIOL Dissertation Research: Male Fitness in a Single Cell: The Evolutionary Significance of Sperm Morphology
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
May 01, 2015 – April 30, 2017
AS-BIOL Meeting: Evolutionary Endocrinology: Hormones as Mediators of Evolutionary Phenomena (SICB Symposium, January 5, 2016 in Portland, OR)
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
August 01, 2015 – July 31, 2016
BIOL 3020: Evolution and Ecology
Credits: 3
Examines the mechanisms of evolutionary change, with an emphasis on the genetic and evolutionary principles needed to understand the diversification of life on earth.  Covers the ecology of individuals and population dynamics.  Major topics include the genetics and ecology of natural populations, adaptation, molecular evolution and macroevolution, and the application of evolutionary and ecological concepts to conservation biology.  Required for all Biology majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2200 or BIOL 2020. BIOL 3020 is not repeatable.
BIOL 4150: Evolution of Sex
Credits: 3
Despite the many benefits of asexual reproduction, the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms reproduce sexually. How sex evolved, and how it persists despite its many associated costs, are major unanswered questions in biology. We will explore the diversity of sexual reproduction and associated evolutionary phenomena with a focus on critically evaluating current research and theory in this field. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or permission from Instructor
BIOL 4920: Independent Research in Biology
Credits: 2
Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member within the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
BIOL 4930: Distinguished Major Thesis Research
Credits: 2
This course is the final semester of Independent Research for participants of the Biology Distinguished Majors Program. During this semester, students will complete their laboratory investigations, ultimately presenting the sum of their work in a written thesis. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
BIOL 7150: Evolution of Sex
Credits: 3
Despite the many benefits of asexual reproduction, the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms reproduce sexually. How sex evolved, and how it persists despite its many associated costs, are major unanswered questions in biology. We will explore the diversity of sexual reproduction and associated evolutionary phenomena with a focus on critically evaluating current research and theory in this field. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or permission from Instructor
BIOL 8081: Advanced Ecology and Evolution 1
Credits: 4
This course introduces grad students to a breadth and depth of concepts and theories in modern ecology and evolutionary biology. The couse is co-taught by two BIOL faculty each fall, with different faculty rotating into the course in alternate years, providing expertise in molecular population genetics, genomics, phylogenetics, integrative biology, speciation, microevolution, life-history evolution, and mating systems.
BIOL 8082: Advanced Ecology and Evolution 2
Credits: 2
This course introduces grad students to a breadth and depth of concepts and theories in modern ecology and evolutionary biology.. The course is taught by a different BIOL faculty each spring, with different faculty rotating into the course in alternate years, providing expertise in molecular population genetics, genomics, phylogenetics, integrative biology, speciation, microevolution, life-history evolution, and mating systems.
BIOL 8084: Advanced Ecology and Evolution 4
Credits: 2
This course introduces grad students to a breadth and depth of concepts and theories in modern ecology and evolutionary biology.. The course is taught by a different BIOL faculty each spring, with different faculty rotating into the course in alternate years, providing expertise in molecular population genetics, genomics, phylogenetics, integrative biology, speciation, microevolution, life-history evolution, and mating systems.
BIOL 8260: Writing in Science: creating grant and research proposals
Credits: 2
Developing skill in communicating scientific principles and writing compelling research proposals is essential for successful graduate training in the biological sciences. This seminar and workshop course will focus on how to create effective grant and research proposals in preparation for thesis research. Students will be actively involved by presenting their research progress and plans, and critiquing each other's written proposals.
BIOL 8270: Seven Habits of Highly Effective Graduate Students
Credits: 2
Weekly discussion to acclimate new graduate students to rigors of academic research in the Department of Biology. There will be an emphasis on time management, scientific writing, presentations, and work-life balance. A rotation of Biology faculty, students, and staff will contribute to the weekly discussion.
BIOL 8559: New Course in Biology
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of biology.
BIOL 8999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
BIOL 9910: Rotation Research
Credits: 3
An exposure to the working techniques and interactions of the modern Biological Laboratory. Required of all first-year biology graduate students.
BIOL 9920: Rotation Research
Credits: 3
An exposure to the working techniques and interactions of the modern Biological Laboratory. Required of all first-year biology graduate students.
BIOL 9995: Topical Research in Biology
Credits: 1–12
Independent research with a member of the Biology faculty in preparation for thesis or dissertation research.
BIOL 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
BIOL 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.