Richard Schragger headshot
RS

Richard C. Schragger

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB177E
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. Harvard Law School 1996
M.A. University College London 1993
B.A. University of Pennsylvania
Biography

Rich Schragger joined the Virginia faculty in 2001 and was named the Perre Bowen Professor in 2013. His scholarship focuses on the intersection of constitutional law and local government law, federalism, urban policy and the constitutional and economic status of cities. He also writes about law and religion. He has authored articles on the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses, the role of cities in a federal system, local recognition of same-sex marriage, takings law and economic development, and the history of the anti-chain store movement. Schragger has published in the Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Virginia, and Michigan law reviews, among others. He teaches property, local government law, urban law and policy, and church and state.

Schragger received an M.A. in legal theory from University College London and received his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School. He was a supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review. After clerking for Dolores Sloviter, then-chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, Schragger joined the Washington, D.C., firm Miller, Cassidy, Larroca & Lewin, where he practiced for two years.

Schragger has been a visiting professor at Quinnipiac, Georgetown, NYU, Chicago, and Tel Aviv. He was the Samuel Rubin Visiting Professor at Columbia. He is the author of City Power: Urban Governance in a Global Age (Oxford University Press, 2016).

LAW 6006: Property
Credits: 4
The course is a general introduction to property concepts and different types of property interests, particularly real property. The course surveys present and future estates in land, ownership and concurrent ownership. Leasehold interests, gifts and bequests, covenants and servitudes, conveyancing, various land use restrictions, eminent domain, and intellectual and personal property issues are also considered.
LAW 8662: Religious Liberty and the Scholarly Process - Fall (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the first semester of a year-long course considering the jurisprudence of religious liberty in the United States with special emphasis on recent judicial and scholarly debates about religious exemptions, corporate religious rights, equal funding of the religious mission, church autonomy, religion's distinctiveness, and the future of church-state separation.
LAW 8663: Religious Liberty and the Scholarly Process - Spring (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a year-long course considering the jurisprudence of religious liberty in the United States with special emphasis on recent judicial and scholarly debates about religious exemptions, corporate religious rights, equal funding of the religious mission, church autonomy, religion's distinctiveness, and the future of church-state separation.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8818: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8819: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9108: Urban Law and Policy
Credits: 3
This course will examine the legal, economic, and political forces that have shaped American metropolitan areas with particular attention to the policies that have shaped American cities and suburbs. The course will consider issues such as sprawl, racial segregation, housing, education, land use, concentrated poverty, and community economic development.
LAW 9307: Urban Legal History
Credits: 3
This research seminar focuses on the legal issues relating to Charlottesville's political, social, and economic development. It explores larger themes in land use, local government, and property theory by studying the physical development of Charlottesville and Albemarle from 1634 to the present.
LAW 9308: Liberalism and Its Critics
Credits: 3
In this seminar we will study liberalism and its contemporary critics. We will begin by considering what liberalism is, in its political, philosophical, economic, and legal forms. Then we survey various critiques--religious, communitarian, libertarian, socialist, populist, among others.
LAW 9320: Race, Law, and the Southern City
Credits: 3
This course will focus on the legal, political, and social history of Charlottesville in order to develop a broader account of how race, law, land use, and economic development intersect in a small southern town. The physical development of Charlottesville from colonial to present times will be discussed, as will subjects such as residential racial segregation, redevelopment, urban renewal, school desegregation, and citycounty conflicts.
LAW 9342: Law of Place and Place of Law
Credits: 3
This course invites students to inquire into the relationship between places and law specific to those places. It will explore not only how law is tailored to particular physical, social, and cultural environments but also how it shapes those environments as it is applied.