Rachel Harmon headshot
RH

Rachel A. Harmon

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB379
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. Yale Law School 1996
M.Sc. London School of Economics 1993
M.Sc. London School of Economics 1992
B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1990
Biography

Rachel Harmon teaches in the areas of criminal law, criminal procedure and civil rights. Her scholarship focuses on policing and its regulation, and her work has appeared recently in the NYU, Michigan and Stanford law reviews, among others. She serves as associate reporter on the American Law Institute’s project on policing.

From 1998 to 2006, Harmon served as a prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice. After a brief stint at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of Virginia, Harmon worked in the Civil Rights Division, Criminal Section, prosecuting hate crimes and official misconduct cases, many of which involved excessive force or sexual abuse by police officers. She left the Justice Department to join the law faculty as an associate professor of law in the fall of 2006.

Harmon received her law degree at Yale Law School, where she was articles editor for the Yale Law Journal and the Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities. Before law school, as a British Marshall Scholar, she earned an M.Sc. in political theory and an M.Sc. in political sociology, both with distinction, from the London School of Economics. After law school, she clerked for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court.

LAW 6003: Criminal Law
Credits: 3
This course explores the basic principles of Anglo-American criminal law, including the constituent elements of criminal offenses, the necessary predicates for criminal liability, the major concepts of justification and excuse, and the conditions under which offenders can be liable for attempt. Major emphasis is placed on the structure and interpretation of modern penal codes.
LAW 7009: Criminal Procedure Survey
Credits: 4
In this course, we will explore the constitutional rules that constrain executive actors when they investigate crime and prosecute criminal defendants. Specifically, we study the degree to which the Fourth and Fifth Amendment limit police investigations and the ways in which constitutional guarantees of due process, equal protection, and trial by jury affect criminal prosecutions. Mutually Exclusive with LAW 7018 and LAW 7019.
LAW 7106: Law of the Police
Credits: 3
This course will explore the web of interacting federal, state, and local laws that govern the police and police departments.
LAW 7193: Advanced Topics in Law of the Police
Credits: 2
What happens when police officers break the law? How do legal remedies influence police conduct? This course will look at some of the major legal consequences imposed for police misconduct and ask what role constitutional remedies and their state law counterparts play in encouraging the police to follow the law.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.