PK

P.J.E. Kershaw

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of History
Office location and address
235 Nau
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
PhD, King's College, University of London, 1999
MPhil, Medieval History, Jesus College, University of Cambridge, 1991
BA (Hons), First Class, Medieval and Modern History, King's College, University of London, 1989
Biography

Research Fields 

North-Western Europe and the Mediterranean world in late antiquity and the earlier Middle Ages, with a concentration upon the period c. CE 700-950; Carolingian Europe; post-Roman Britain; the Viking world; early medieval diasporas; political thought and practice; historiography; travel, cross-cultural communication, and diplomacy. 

Books

Cities, Saints and Communities in Early Medieval Europe, Studies in the Early Middle Ages, 46, edited with Scott DeGregorio (Brepols, 2020). 408 pp. Link. 

Peaceful Kings. Peace, Power and the Early Medieval Political Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2011). xvii + 313 pp. Link

The Early Medieval Inscriptions of Brittany/Les inscriptions de la Bretagne du Haut Moyen Âge, with W. Davies, J. Graham-Campbell, M. Handley, J. Koch, G. Le Duc and K. Lockyear (Celtic Studies Publications, 2000). xviii + 340 pp. 

Selected Articles

'English History and Irish Readers in the Frankish World’, in D. Ganz and P. Fouracre, eds, Frankland. The Franks and the World of Early Medieval Europe (Manchester University Press, 2008), pp. 126-51.

‘Eberhard of Friuli, a Carolingian Lay Intellectual’, in P. Wormald and J. L. Nelson, eds, Lay Intellectuals in the Carolingian World (Cambridge University Press, 2007, paperback 2011), pp. 77-105. 

'Laughter After Babel's Fall: Miscommunication and Misunderstanding in the Early Middle Ages', in Guy Halsall, ed., Humour, History and Politics in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (Cambridge University Press, 2002, paperback 2010), pp. 179-202.   

'Power, Prayer and Illness in Asser's Life of Alfred', Early Medieval Europe 10.2 (2001), 201-24 

'The Alfred-Guthrum Treaty: Scripting Accommodation and Interaction in Viking-Age England', in D. Hadley and J.D. Richards, eds, Cultures in Contact. Scandinavian Settlement in England (Brepols, 2000),pp. 43-64. 

Major Online Projects

M. Handley, P.J.E. Kershaw, K. Lockyear, with W. Davies, K. Forsyth, J. Graham-Campbell and J.-P. Wilson, CISP Database of all Non-runic Inscriptions from Ireland, Scotland, Isle of Man, Wales, South-Western England and Brittany,400-1100 AD  (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/cisp/database).

HIEU 1501: Introductory Seminar in Pre-1700 European History
Credits: 3
Intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIEU 2061: The Birth of Europe
Credits: 3
Studies ways of life and thought in the formation of Western Europe from the 4th century a.d. to the 15th. Includes a survey of the development of society and culture in town and countryside, the growth of economic, political, and religious institutions, and the impact of Muslim and Byzantine civilizations.
HIEU 3141: Age of Conquests: Britain from the Romans to the Normans (43-1066)
Credits: 3
Surveys the history of Britain from the establishment of Roman rule to the Norman Conquest of 1066. Particular focus falls upon the social, political and cultural history of early England and its neighbors in Wales and Scotland, the Scandinavian impact of the 8th through 11th centuries, and Britain's links with the wider late antique and early medieval worlds.
HIST 4501: Major Seminar
Credits: 4
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4501: Seminar in Pre-1700 European History
Credits: 4
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4511: Colloquium in Pre-1700 European History
Credits: 4
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
MSP 4995: Capstone Project in Medieval Studies
Credits: 3
For advanced students dealing with methods of research in the field.
HIST 8999: Research in History
Credits: 1–12
For master's essay and other research carried out prior to advancement to candidacy, taken under the supervision of the student's adviser.
HIEU 9031: Tutorial in Anglo-Saxon History
Credits: 3
This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the study of Anglo-Saxon England from the fifth to the eleventh centuries, its historiography and the range of methodologies and disciplinary approaches applied to its analysis. The class is intended to be timely and comprehensive. Archaeology, material culture and the close analysis of key primary sources and attendant scholarship will all be addressed.
HIEU 9035: Tutorial in the History of the Early Medieval Mediterranean
Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the study of the post classical Mediterranean from the fifth to the tenth centuries, its historiography and the range of methodologies and disciplinary approaches pursued in its analysis. The class is not intended to be exhaustive; it is meant to be timely and comprehensive, and to balance core classic studies with often very recent historical and archaeological scholarship.
HIST 9962: General Exam Preparation
Credits: 3
In this course, students will prepare for the general examination under the guidance of a faculty examiner. During the course, the student will identify relevant readings; complete and review those readings; and explore the larger questions raised by those readings and their fields more generally.
HIST 9964: Master's Essay Revision
Credits: 3
This course is intended for PhD candidates to revise their master's essays for publication under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. It is typically taken in first semester of the second year of study.
HIST 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 3–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
HIST 9999: Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of the dissertation director.

Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (elected 2013)

NEH/Richard A. and Sara Page Mayo Distinguished Teaching Professorship (2013-16)

University of Virginia Alumni Board of Trustees Teaching Award (2005)