Paul Mahoney headshot
PM

Paul G. Mahoney

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB171B
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. Yale Law School 1984
B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1981
Biography

Paul G. Mahoney is a David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor and served as dean of the Law School from 2008-16. Mahoney's teaching and research areas are securities regulation, law and economic development, corporate finance, financial derivatives and contracts. He has published widely in law reviews and peer-reviewed finance and law and economics journals. His book, "Wasting a Crisis: Why Securities Regulation Fails," was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2015.

Mahoney joined the Law School faculty in 1990 after practicing law with the New York firm of Sullivan & Cromwell and clerking for Judge Ralph K. Winter, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice Thurgood Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court. He served as academic associate dean at the Law School from 1999 to 2004 and has held the Albert C. BeVier Research Chair and the Brokaw Chair in Corporate Law. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Law School, the University of Southern California Law School and the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He has also worked on legal reform projects in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia and Nepal.

Mahoney is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He served as an associate editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives from 2004 to 2007 and as a director of the American Law and Economics Association from 2002 to 2004. He is a past recipient of the All-University Outstanding Teacher Award and the Law School's Traynor Award for excellence in faculty scholarship.

LAW 6002: Contracts
Credits: 4
This course examines the legal obligations that attach to promises made in a business contract or otherwise, including the remedies that may be available for promises that are not kept. The course examines the legal requirements for enforceable contracts, including consideration, consent and conditions, and the effect of fraud, mistake, unconscionability, and impossibility.
LAW 7798: The Business of Banking and Prudential Regulation (SC)
Credits: 1
The course will focus on the prudential regulation of banking through capital, liquidity, and related requirements. It will begin by describing the business of banking before turning to prudential regulation and finishing with an in-depth look at the Liquidity Coverage Ratio in Basel III.
LAW 8007: Derivatives Markets and Their Regulations
Credits: 3
This course studies financial instruments other than common stock and conventional debt securities. Topics include options and financial futures, structured preferred stocks, exotic debt securities such as commodity-linked bonds, and swap agreements. What is the economic function of these instruments; how are they valued; and how are they treated by the regulatory system?
LAW 8016: Securities Regulation
Credits: 3–4
The course will examine the federal statutes and regulations relating to the sale of securities and the duties of issuers, underwriters, brokers, dealers, officers, directors, controlling persons, and other significant market participants. We will discuss the regulation of public and private offerings, trading markets, and disclosure and corporate governance of publicly traded companies. Enrollment not allowed in LAW 8016 or 8017 if either taken previously.
LAW 8017: Securities Regulation (Law & Business)
Credits: 3–4
The course will examine the federal statutes and regulations relating to the sale of securities and the duties of issuers, underwriters, brokers, dealers, officers, directors, and other market participants. Topics will include the regulation of public and private offerings, trading markets, accounting standards, the lawyer's role in verifying financial information, and the use of finance theory in securities litigation.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9999: Dissertation Research
Credits: 15
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.