Paul Stephan headshot
PS

Paul B. Stephan

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB385
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. University of Virginia School of Law 1977
M.A. Yale University 1974
B.A. Yale University 1973
Biography

Paul B. Stephan is an expert on international business, international dispute resolution and comparative law, with an emphasis on Soviet and post-Soviet legal systems. In addition to writing prolifically in these fields, Stephan has advised governments and international organizations, taken part in cases in the Supreme Court of the United States, the federal courts, and various foreign judicial and arbitral proceedings, and lectured to professionals and scholarly groups around the world on issues raised by the globalization of the world economy. During 2006-07, he served as counselor on international law in the U.S. Department of State. He currently is a coordinating reporter for the American Law Institute’s Restatement (Fourth) of the Foreign Relations Law of the United States. Other interests for Stephan, who joined the University of Virginia’s law faculty in 1979, include taxation and constitutional law.

Stephan received his B.A. and M.A. from Yale University in 1973 and 1974, respectively, and his J.D. from the University of Virginia in 1977. In law school he was executive editor of the Virginia Law Review and a member of the Order of the Coif. Before returning to Virginia, he clerked for Judge Levin Campbell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. He has taught as a visiting professor at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations, the University of Vienna, Münster University, Lausanne University, Melbourne University, University of Pantheon-Assas (Paris II), Sciences Po, the Interdisciplinary Centre Herzliya, Sydney University and the Peking University School of Transnational Law in Shenzhen, China. He also has visited at Columbia Law School and Duke Law School.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Stephan took part in a variety of projects involving law reform in former socialist states. He worked in Russia, Georgia, Ukraine, Albania and Slovakia on behalf of the U.S. Treasury and in Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan on behalf of the International Monetary Fund. He also organized training programs for tax administrators and judges from all of the formerly socialist countries under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. His casebook on international business is used at law schools both in the United States and abroad. He is the co-author, with Robert Scott, of The Limits of Leviathan: Contract Theory and the Enforcement of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2006). His current research interests include a book on the political economy of international lawmaking.

LW-INST-OSP-Stephan-Aug2020-21
Source: U.S. Department Of Defense
August 17, 2020 – August 16, 2021
LAW 6002: Contracts
Credits: 4
This course examines the legal obligations that attach to promises made in a business contract or otherwise, including the remedies that may be available for promises that are not kept. The course examines the legal requirements for enforceable contracts, including consideration, consent and conditions, and the effect of fraud, mistake, unconscionability, and impossibility.
LAW 6006: Property
Credits: 4
The course is a general introduction to property concepts and different types of property interests, particularly real property. The course surveys present and future estates in land, ownership and concurrent ownership. Leasehold interests, gifts and bequests, covenants and servitudes, conveyancing, various land use restrictions, eminent domain, and intellectual and personal property issues are also considered.
LAW 7121: International Trade and Investment
Credits: 3
This course introduces the institutions and rules governing international trade and investment. Policy perspectives are taken from international economic theory and theories of international relations. The focus is the emergent World Trade Organization, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and various institutions of U.S. trade policy; and other treaties and international legal regimes that provide international arbitration of disputes.
LAW 7654: National Security, Human Rights, and the Courts (SC)
Credits: 1
Terrorism against individuals and states has become a serious challenge for civilized societies at the turn of the 21st century - due to the physical threats it poses on the one hand and the fear that taking extreme measures against its perpetrators will overstep democratic values and infringe human rights on the other hand. The course is dedicated to analyzing the ways legal systems perceive terror and try to fight it.
LAW 7729: International Trade Law (SC)
Credits: 2
This course examines fundamental legal frameworks governing global business and international trade relations between states.
LAW 8652: Emerging Markets: Principles and Practice
Credits: 3
This seminar explores the legal and regulatory structures affecting foreign investors seeking to participate in the development of so-called "emerging markets" and in particular in the restructuring of formerly socialist economies.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8820: Exchange: University of Auckland
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8821: Exchange: Bucerius Law School
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8822: Exchange: University of Melbourne
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8825: Exchange: Waseda University
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8826: Exchange: University of Sydney
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8827: Exchange: Instituto de Empresa (IE)
Credits: 12–13
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8828: Exchange: Seoul National University
Credits: 12
Selected students may participate in this international exchange program during the fall semester of their third year.
LAW 8844: Dual Degree: Sciences Po (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong international combined-degree with University Paris 1 Pantheon - Sorbonne Law School and Sciences Po/Paris in which selected students can participate during their third year.
LAW 8845: Dual Degree: Sciences Po (YR)
Credits: 27
This course is the second semester of a yearlong international combined-degree with University Paris 1 Pantheon - Sorbonne Law School and Sciences Po/Paris in which selected students can participate during their third year.