Paul Dobryden headshot
PD

Paul A. Dobryden

Assistant Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Office location and address
New Cabell Room 243
1605 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Education
Ph.D. in German Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 2014
B.A. in German and Comparative Literature, University of Michigan, 2004
INST 1550: Interdisciplinary Studies-Student Initiated Courses
Credits: 1–3
With sponsorship and supervision by a faculty member and approval of the Dean's Office, acting for the Committee on Educational Programs and the Curriculum, students may initiate a course in which they provide the instruction. The grade is determined by the faculty member. These courses count as "outside the College." Students in the College may offer no more than 3.0 credits for the B.A. or B.S. Consult the INST course web page at http://www.uvastudentcouncil.com/student-services/initiatives/cavalier-education-program/ (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.
GERM 3000: Advanced German
Credits: 3
This course builds on the first and second year German sequence and seeks to increase students' level of competence in both grammar and vocabulary. Students will produce more accurate and complex language and begin to discuss a diverse range of topics in German culture. Grammatical accuracy will be a central focus but also register, appropriacy, and fluency. Prerequisite: GERM 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
GERM 3010: Texts and Interpretations
Credits: 3
Employing a broad definition of text, this course allows students to develop a complex understanding of the relationship between meaning and linguistic form. Course readings may include poems, novels, films, historical documents, letters, memoirs etc. Specific grammatical topics will be addressed on the basis of the given material. This course is the prerequisite for all GERM 3000- level courses. Prerequisite: GERM 2020 or instructor permission.
MDST 3201: New German Cinema
Credits: 3
Examines German art cinema from the 1960s-1980s, focusing on modernist aesthetics and filmic responses to major historical events in post-war Germany. Films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, Sander, von Trotta, and others.
GETR 3471: Weimar Cinema
Credits: 3
This course explores the film culture of the Weimar period (1918-1933). Rife with ambition, experimentation, and sometimes disastrous failure, Weimar cinema forces us to confront fundamental questions of how moving images work, what they can do, and how they relate to the sociopolitical conditions that produce them.
GERM 3510: Topics in German Culture
Credits: 3
Studies selected aspects of German culture, such as opera. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or 3230.
GETR 3559: New Course in German in Translation
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of German in translation. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.
GETR 3562: New German Cinema
Credits: 3
Examines German art cinema from the 1960s-1980s, focusing on modernist aesthetics and filmic responses to major historical events in post-war Germany. Films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, Sander, von Trotta, and others.
GETR 3566: Topics in film
Credits: 3
The course reflects on the often complicated ways in which representations of violence are related to gender codes. we will look especially at films that depict and document the topos of Lager/Camp: the Camp functions as metaphor, as fantasy, gendered space, laboratory, and heterotopia,. Critical look at films that imagine the camp both as a historical site or as a hiding place.
MDST 3584: Global Cinema
Credits: 3
This course entails study of films originating from and/or identified with non-US nations and cultures. Topics include: introduction to a nation's cinematic achievements (e.g., Korean cinema); in-depth study of one or more influential cinematic movements (e.g., French New Wave; Italian Neo-Realism); exploration of a particular historical period (e.g., German silent cinema). The course fulfills the non-US requirement for the Media Studies major.