Noelle Hurd headshot
NH

Noelle Hurd

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Psychology
Office location and address
201 Gilmer Hall
485 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Biography

Dr. Noelle Hurd's research agenda has primarily focused on the promotion of healthy adolescent development among marginalized youth. Specifically, her work has focused on identifying opportunities to build on pre-existing strengths in youths’ lives, such as supportive intergenerational relationships. Using a resilience framework, she has assessed the potential of nonparental adults to serve as resources to marginalized youth, and she has investigated the processes through which these relationships affect a variety of youth outcomes (e.g., psychological distress, health-risk behaviors, academic achievement). Currently, she is investigating the role of contextual factors in promoting or deterring the formation of intergenerational relationships and shaping the nature of interactions between marginalized youth and the adults in their communities. She also is further examining the mechanisms that drive the promotive effects of natural mentoring relationships and developing an intervention focused on enhancing positive intergenerational relationships between adolescents and the nonparental adults in their everyday lives. She runs the Promoting Healthy Adolescent Development (PHAD) Lab at the University of Virginia. She is a current William T. Grant Scholar and a Spencer/National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellow. In 2015, she was recognized as a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science. In 2017, she received the Outstanding Professor Award from the UVA Department of Psychology. Her research is currently funded by the William T. Grant Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the National Science Foundation.

Developing an Effective White Bystander Intervention to Reduce Racial Inequality in Higher Education
Source: William T. Grant Foundation
September 01, 2020 – August 31, 2023
AS-PSYC Critical Contexts for the Formation of Natural Mentoring Relationships among Economically Disadvantaged African American Adolescents: A Focus on Families and Neighborhoods
Source: William T. Grant Foundation
July 01, 2014 – July 31, 2021
AS-PSYC Development of Project Dream: An After-School Program to Promote Academic Success via Social and Emotional Learning and Connectedness with Adults
Source: U.S. Department Of Education
August 01, 2015 – January 01, 2020
Understanding the Role of Social Media in Perpetuating Racial Inequality in Higher Education
Source: William T. Grant Foundation
September 01, 2017 – August 31, 2018
AS-PSYC The Role of Mentors in the Academic Success of Underrepresented Students across their College Years
Source: National Academy Of Education
September 01, 2015 – August 31, 2017
AS-PSYC Promoting Professional and Research Growth of a Postdoctoral Fellow Through Mentoring
Source: William T. Grant Foundation
July 01, 2015 – June 30, 2017
PSYC 3445: Introduction to Clinical Psychology
Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide an overview of the academic and clinical activities within the field of clinical psychology. Theories, research, psycho therapeutic approaches, and critical professional issues will be explored.
PSYC 3590: Research in Psychology
Credits: 2–3
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.
PSYC 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.
PSYC 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.
PSYC 7480: Critical Perspectives for Psychological Reseach
Credits: 3
In this graduate seminar, we will take a close look at concepts and theoretical perspectives emerging from and guiding the field of community psychology including empowerment, resilience, critical race theory, Black feminism, intersectionality, critical consciousness, and sociopolitical resistance. This course will encourage students to apply these frames to critically examine their own research.
PSYC 7485: Structural Determinants of Inequality
Credits: 3
This course focuses on the structural underpinnings of modern inequality in the United States. Particular attention will be paid to intersections of race and class and the systematic construction of unequal opportunity over time.
PSYC 7503: Contemporary Issues: Community Psychology
Credits: 2
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 8998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Thesis
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PSYC 9501: Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9980: Practicum in Case Consultation
Credits: 1–7
Supervision in case assessment, evaluation, and intervention. Emphasizes issues involved in case management; types of issues and decisions that may affect the outcome of intervention; pragmatic issues in dealing with people referred as clients; consultation procedures with referral agencies; and liaisons with community agencies. Student performance is evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
PSYC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.