Nizar Hermes headshot
NH

Nizar F. Hermes

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures
Office location and address
141 New Cabell Hall
1605 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Biography

I  received a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Toronto‚Äôs Centre for Comparative Literature, in association with the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations. Before joining the University of Virginia, I  taught at the University of Toronto, Princeton University, and the University of Oklahoma. While my research interests are interdisciplinary and comparative in scope, I am particularly interested in medieval and early modern Euro-Islamic contacts,  intercultural contacts in the premodern world, North African and Andalusian studies, world literatures and culture

ARTR 3245: Arabic Literary Delights
Credits: 3
In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.
MEST 3492: The Afro-Arabs and Africans of the Middle East and North Africa
Credits: 3
This course offers an in-depth historical, philological, and socio-cultural exploration into the representation of the Afro-Arab and the African as depicted across a wide range of Arabic and Islamicate chronicles, saints' lives, and folktales, among sundry other genres. In the course of the semester, special attention will be given to significant moments in the history of Afro-Arab and Arab-African encounters.
ARTR 3559: New Course in Arabic in Translation
Credits: 1–4
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation
ARAB 4245: Readings in Classical Arabic Prose
Credits: 3
Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential "Arab" literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage. Prereq: ARAB 3020 or Instructor Permission.
MEST 4991: Middle East Studies Seminar
Credits: 3
Middle East Studies Seminar
SAST 4991: South Asian Studies Capstone Seminar
Credits: 3
This is the fourth-year capstone seminar for students majoring in South Asian Studies. This course will draw on the multidisciplinary interests of the students who participate to create a collaborative and collegial environment in which to investigate some of the foundational concepts and categories involved in the construction of "South Asia" as unified area of academic discourse.
ARAB 5245: Readings in Classical Arabic Prose
Credits: 3
Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential 'Arab' literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage.
ARTR 5245: Arabic Literary Delights
Credits: 3
In this course we will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene. We will organize the course around selected readings from a variety of premodern Arabic jocular, culinary and erotological literature available in English translations.
MEST 5492: The Afro-Arabs and Africans of the Middle East and North Africa
Credits: 3
This course offers an in-depth historical, philological, and socio-cultural exploration into the representation of the Afro-Arab and the African as depicted across a wide range of Arabic and Islamicate chronicles, saints' lives, and folktales, among sundry other genres. In the course of the semester, special attention will be given to significant moments in the history of Afro-Arab and Arab-African encounters.
ARTR 5559: New Course in Arabic in Translation
Credits: 1–4
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation.
MESA 8993: Independent Study II
Credits: 1–3
Independent Study II