Mark Thomas headshot
MT

Mark Thomas

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of History
Office location and address
381 Nau Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.A. Oxford 1976
M.A. Cornell 1979
D.Phil. Oxford 1984
Dissertation Research Support for Scott Miller (2)
Source: Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
October 01, 2018 – May 31, 2019
AS-HIST Disserttion Research Support for Scott Miller
Source: Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
September 01, 2017 – May 31, 2018
EGMT 1530: Engaging Difference
Credits: 2
In this class, students will learn to critically reflect on one's own situation and perspective in relations to one's expanding knowledge of other human experiences, seeking to cultivate a framework for informed reflection on human diversity and social complexity while developing empathy as a foundation for democratic citizenship.
EGMT 1540: Ethical Engagement
Credits: 2
In this class students will learn to reflect upon and evaluate human conduct and character, consider the ethical components of individual and collective behaviors, and engage in the articulation of ethical questions and moral deliberation.
USEM 1580: University Seminar
Credits: 2–3
Consult the University Seminars web page at www.virginia.edu/provost/USEMS.html (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.
ECON 2060: American Economic History
Credits: 3
Surveys American economic history from colonial origins to the present. Cross-listed as HIUS 2061.
HIUS 2061: American Economic History
Credits: 3
Studies American economic history from its colonial origins to the present. Cross-listed as ECON 2060.
SOC 2241: Crime and Punishment in Britain and the United States
Credits: 3
This course is organized around two main themes: understanding the causes of crime and how societies respond to it. All topics are approached from sociological, philosophical, historical and empirical perspectives, with the aim that students will gain an analytically sophisticated understanding of some of the key contemporary issues in criminology and penology on both sides of the Atlantic.
SOC 2701: Health and Welfare in Britain and America: Policy and Practice
Credits: 3
This course has two aims: to examine key themes in the sociology of health and illness through an exploration of the delivery of health-care in Britain and the United States; and to discuss some of the major global debates in the political economy of health. The course will cover health and health systems, health inequalities, and contemporary issues in the political economy of health.
HIST 3050: Modern Imperialism: The British and American Experience
Credits: 3
This course examines the patterns of development of Great Britain and the United States as international powers. It illustrates their differences and similarities, what they have to tell us about the role of dependency on great power status, and the effects these had on their politics, economics and societies, as well as the countries with which they became involved.
PLCP 3125: Politics in Britain and America: a Comparative Perspective
Credits: 3
This course will provide an introduction to the comparative politics of the US and the UK. Attention will be given to similarities as well as differences, and the course will use comparative analysis to throw light on the political systems in both countries. Occasional reference will be made to other countries. No prior knowledge of British politics will be assumed, but prior knowledge of US politics will be.
HIUS 3411: American Business
Credits: 3
Surveys the rise of the modern corporate form of American business and an analysis of the underlying factors which shaped that development.
LPPS 3420: Law and Public Policy: Great Britain, Europe and the US
Credits: 3
This course examines the legal underpinnings of key public policy challenges facing Great Britain, Europe, and the U.S. From the policy and regulatory perspective, problem-solving in such areas as the environment, immigration, trade, labor, social welfare, national security, and education depend on nations having functional and effective laws in place.
PPOL 3420: Law and Public Policy: Great Britain, Europe and the US
Credits: 3
This course examines the legal underpinnings of key public policy challenges facing Great Britain, Europe, and the U.S. From the policy and regulatory perspective, problem-solving in such areas as the environment, immigration, trade, labor, social welfare, national security, and education depend on nations having functional and effective laws in place.
ZFOR 3503: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3506: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
ZFOR 3512: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
PLIR 3620: Politics of the European Union
Credits: 3
This course will give an overview of the politics of the European Union. Attention will be paid to theoretical approaches to European integration (week 1), the structure of the EU and its constituent institutions (week 2), and finally policies and outcomes, and current topics and debates (week 3). No prior knowledge of the EU will be assumed, but familiarity with core concepts in political science and international relations will be. Students who have previously taken PLIR 3610 will not receive credit for PLIR 3620; students who take PLIR 3620 may not receive credit for PLIR 3610 if taken subsequently.
ECON 4400: Topics in Economic History
Credits: 3
Comparative study of the historical development of selected advanced economies (e.g., the United States, England, Japan, continental Europe). The nations covered vary with instructor. Prerequisite: ECON 3020, or ECON 2010 and 2020 and instructor permission.
HIST 4400: Topics in Economic History
Credits: 3
Comparative study of the historical development of selected advanced economies (e.g., the United States, England, Japan, continental Europe). The nations covered vary with instructor. Cross-listed with ECON 4400.
HIST 4591: Topics in History
Credits: 3–4
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIST 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.
HIEU 5352: The British Economy Since 1850
Credits: 3
Studies the structure, performance and policy in the British economy since 1850, focusing on the causes and consequences of Britain's relative economic decline. Cross listed as ECON 5352.
HIST 5559: New Course in General History
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 8999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
HIST 9020: Tutorial in the History of the International Economy since 1850
Credits: 3
This tutorial will examine certain key issues and debates in the History of the International Economy since 1850.
HIST 9032: Tutorial in Quantitative Methods for Historians
Credits: 3
This tutorial will introduce students to the main uses of quantitative methods employed by historians, including sampling techniques; parametric and non-parametric methods; regression analysis; and logit, probit, and Tobit models. No prior knowledge of statistics is required.
HIUS 9035: Tutorial in American Economic History
Credits: 3
A graduate tutorial devoted to close analysis of key issues in American Economic History from 1750 to 1940.
HIST 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 3–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
HIST 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.