Micah Schwartzman headshot
MS

Micah J. Schwartzman

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB179F
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. University of Virginia School of Law 2005
D.Phil. University of Oxford 2003
B.A. University of Virginia 1998
Biography

Micah Schwartzman joined the faculty in 2007. He teaches constitutional law and the First Amendment (Religion Clauses). His areas of interest include law and religion, jurisprudence, and political philosophy.

Schwartzman received his B.A. from the University of Virginia and his doctorate in politics from the University of Oxford, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. During law school, he served as articles development editor of the Virginia Law Review and received numerous awards, including the Margaret G. Hyde Award, the Daniel Rosenbloom Award, and the Hardy Cross Dillard Scholarship. After graduating, Schwartzman clerked for Judge Paul V. Niemeyer of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Prior to joining the faculty, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at Columbia University’s Society of Fellows in the Humanities. In the spring of 2013, he was a visiting professor at the UCLA School of Law.

LAW 6001: Constitutional Law
Credits: 4
This course is an introduction to the structure of the U.S. Constitution and the rights and liberties it defines. Judicial review, federalism, congressional powers and limits, the commerce clause, and the 10th Amendment are covered, as are the equal protection and due process clauses.
LAW 7017: Constitutional Law II: Religious Liberty
Credits: 3
This course examines the two clauses in the Bill of Rights which define and safeguard religious freedom - the one barring laws "respecting an establishment of religion" and the other protecting the "free exercise of religion." Is Mutually Exclusive with Religious Liberty Prerequisite: LAW 6001 - Constitutional Law
LAW 8662: Religious Liberty and the Scholarly Process - Fall (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the first semester of a year-long course considering the jurisprudence of religious liberty in the United States with special emphasis on recent judicial and scholarly debates about religious exemptions, corporate religious rights, equal funding of the religious mission, church autonomy, religion's distinctiveness, and the future of church-state separation.
LAW 8663: Religious Liberty and the Scholarly Process - Spring (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a year-long course considering the jurisprudence of religious liberty in the United States with special emphasis on recent judicial and scholarly debates about religious exemptions, corporate religious rights, equal funding of the religious mission, church autonomy, religion's distinctiveness, and the future of church-state separation.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8816: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8817: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8818: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8819: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9064: Advanced Topics in the First Amendment (Religion Clauses)
Credits: 3
This seminar begins with an overview of writings about the freedom of religion, including both philosophical and historical treatments. Following weeks consist of a close critique of one (relatively short) law review article on the subject. The principal objectives are to sharpen skills of close reading and critical analysis as well as to deepen understanding of the difficult issues surrounding the freedom of religion. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9281: Legal Theory Workshop Seminar
Credits: 2–3
This seminar will explore legal issues from a philosophically informed perspective. The course offers the opportunity for students to interact with prominent scholars, to help shape cutting-edge work, to hone their writing skills, to develop their own ideas through independent research, and to gain practice and feedback about the art of asking a good question.
LAW 9308: Liberalism and Its Critics
Credits: 3
In this seminar we will study liberalism and its contemporary critics. We will begin by considering what liberalism is, in its political, philosophical, economic, and legal forms. Then we survey various critiques--religious, communitarian, libertarian, socialist, populist, among others.