Michael Livermore headshot
ML

Michael A. Livermore

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB355
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. New York University School of Law 2006
B.A. University of Albany 2000
Biography

Michael A. Livermore joined the faculty in 2013. He teaches environmental law, administrative law, regulatory law and policy, and advanced seminars on these topics. His research focuses on environmental law, regulation, bureaucratic oversight and the computational analysis of law. He frequently collaborates on interdisciplinary projects with researchers in other academic fields, including economics, computer science and neurology. His work has appeared in leading law journals, including the Yale Law Journal, University of Chicago Law Review, New York University Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal and Duke Law Journal. Livermore is a leading expert on the use of cost-benefit analysis to evaluate environmental regulation, and he is the co-author of Retaking Rationality: How Cost-Benefit Analysis Can Better Protect the Environment and Our Health (Oxford University Press, 2008) and co-editor of The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Prior to joining the faculty, Livermore was the founding executive director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, a think tank dedicated to improving the quality of government decision-making. In that capacity, he participated in dozens of regulatory proceedings on a diverse set of issues ranging from climate change to prison safety. He remains an active participant in environmental policy discussions. Livermore earned his J.D. magna cum laude from NYU Law, where he was a Furman Scholar, was elected to the Order of the Coif, and served as a managing editor of the Law Review. After law school, he spent a year as a fellow at NYU Law's Center on Environmental and Land Use Law before clerking for Judge Harry T. Edwards on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

LAW 6112: Environmental Law
Credits: 3
In Environmental Law, we address pollution control under the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts as well as natural resource protection under the National Environmental Policy Act and Endangered Species Act. Although the primary focus will be on federal law, we will also explore some local, state and international dimensions.
LAW 7136: Regulatory Law and Policy
Credits: 3
This course focuses on the cross-cutting elements of risk regulation to provide students with a set of general tools and concepts that can inform area-specific advanced courses and be applied in many different practice settings. This course complements the material covered in Administrative Law.
LAW 7769: AI, Automation, and the Future of Legal Practice (SC)
Credits: 1
Legal practice has always been shaped by technology as lawyers seek out new ways to better meet the need of their clients at the lowest cost. In this course, we will discuss some newer technologies, how they are being put to use, and the potential upsides and risks associated with the further automation of legal work. No prior knowledge of coding or computer science is assumed.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8816: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8817: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9305: LawTech
Credits: 3
Legal practice has always been shaped by technology as lawyers seek out new ways to better meet the needs of their clients at the lowest cost. In this seminar, we will examine some of these new technologies, how they are being put to use, and the potential upside and downside risks associated with the further automation of legal work. No prior knowledge of coding or computer science is assumed.