Lu Feng headshot
LF

Lu Feng

Assistant Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Computer Science
Office location and address
Olsson Hall, Room 271
85 Engineers Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
​B.Eng. in Information Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 2007
​M.Phil. in Computer Speech, Text and Internet Technology, University of Cambridge, 2008
​D.Phil. in Computer Science, University of Oxford, 2014
Post-Doc ​PRECISE Center, University of Pennsylvania, 2013-2016
Biography

Lu Feng is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Computer Science and Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the University of Virginia. She is also a member of the Link Lab. Previously, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her PhD in Computer Science from the University of Oxford. She also holds a M.Phil. in Computer Speech, Text and Internet Technology from the University of Cambridge and a B.Eng. in Information Engineering from the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications. Her research focuses on assuring the safety, security and reliability of cyber-physical systems (CPS). She develop modeling and analysis methods for CPS, drawing on formal methods, machine learning, optimal control, and human factors. She also work across many different application domains, from medical devices, to autonomous robots, to smart cities. She is a recipient of the James S. McDonnell Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Graduate Scholarship, and Cambridge Trust Scholarship.

CAREER: Formal Methods for Human-Cyber-Physical Systems
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
June 15, 2020 – May 31, 2025
Collaborative Research: DASS: Accountable Software Systems for Safety-Critical Applications
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
October 01, 2021 – September 30, 2024
ELEMENTS: Anharmonic formalism and codes to calculate thermal transport and phase change from first-principles calculations
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
September 01, 2021 – August 31, 2024
Automatically Inferring Human Machine Interaction Properties and Predicting and Adapting to their Violation
Source: U.S. DOD - Air Force - Afosr
June 01, 2021 – May 31, 2024
Joint Perception and Temporal Logic Planning for Distributed Agents in Dynamic Environments
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
September 01, 2018 – August 31, 2022
Intelligently Characterizing Patient Hemodynamic Phenotypes for Advanced Heart Failure in the ESCAPE Trial Using Learned Multi Valued Decision Diagrams
Source: U.S. NIH Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute
February 28, 2020 – August 31, 2022
CRII: CPS: Cognitive Trust in Human-Autonomous Vehicle Interactions
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Computer & Info. Sciences
April 01, 2018 – March 31, 2022
Safe-SCAD: Safety of shared control in autonomous driving
Source: THE UNIVERSITY OF YORK
October 01, 2019 – December 31, 2021
CPS: Medium: Safety-Critical Wireless Mobile Systems
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Computer & Info. Sciences
September 01, 2017 – August 31, 2021
Verification Mentoring Workshop IV
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Computer & Info. Sciences
March 01, 2018 – February 28, 2019
SYS 4053: Systems Design I
Credits: 3
A design project extending throughout the fall semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. Prerequisite: SYS 3021, 3060, and fourth-year standing in the Systems Engineering major.
SYS 4054: Systems Design II
Credits: 3
A design project extending throughout the spring semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. SYS 4053 and fourth-year standing in Systems Engineering major.
CS 4501: Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1–3
Content varies annually, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the department. Similar to CS 5501 and CS 7501, but taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 4710: Artificial Intelligence
Credits: 3
Introduces artificial intelligence. Covers fundamental concepts and techniques and surveys selected application areas. Core material includes state space search, logic, and resolution theorem proving. Application areas may include expert systems, natural language understanding, planning, machine learning, or machine perception. Provides exposure to AI implementation methods, emphasizing programming in Common LISP. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4980: Capstone Research
Credits: 1–3
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Students will seek out a faculty member as an advisor, and do an independent project with said advisor. Instructors can give the 3 credits across multiple semesters, if desired. This course is designed for students who are doing research, and want to use that research for their senior thesis. Note that this track could also be an implementation project, including a group-based project. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. The study is often either a thorough analysis of an abstract computer science problem or the design, implementation, and analysis of a computer system (software or hardware). Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4998: Distinguished BA Majors Research
Credits: 3
Required for Distinguished Majors completing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. An introduction to computer science research and the writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis. Prerequisites: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher and CS BA major status.
CS 6501: Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 3
Course content varies by section and is selected to fill timely and special interests and needs of students. See CS 7501 for example topics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
SYS 6582: Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Detailed study of a selected topic, determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Offered as required.
CS 6890: Industrial Applications
Credits: 1
A graduate student returning from Curricular Practical Training can use this course to claim one credit hour of academic credit after successfully reporting, orally and in writing, a summary of the CPT experience to his/her academic advisor.
SYS 6993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
SYS 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7995: Supervised Project Research
Credits: 3
Formal record of student commitment to project research for the Master of Computer Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CS 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students who are teaching assistants.
SYS 8995: Supervised Project Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
CS 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
CS 9999: Dissertation
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
SYS 9999: Dissertation
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.