Luther Tychonievich headshot
LT

Luther A. Tychonievich

Assistant Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Computer Science
Office location and address
Rice 208
85 Engineers Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​Brigham Young University, 2005
M.S. ​Brigham Young University, 2008
Ph.D. ​University of Virginia, 2013
Biography

Prior to accepting a position as a full-time lecturer in the COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT at the UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, I graduated from the University of Virginia, BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, and LAKELAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE. I wrote my first program and declared my CS major between my second and third year of college; I fell in love with its versatility, scope, and power; it is a field that combines the human-defined purity and elegance of mathematics with the real-world impact of engineering. During my graduate work I became fascinated with the issues relating to education of a new generation of computer scientists and how to help people from backgrounds that are traditionally-underrepresented in CS recognize the marvelous opportunities the field offers and excel in the field. In addition to teaching, I devote significant effort to the education of educators (primarily teaching assistants, but also high-school and college faculty) and to the design of data models that encourage correct mental models in humanities research as part of FHISO and ROOTSDEV.

CS 1110: Introduction to Programming
Credits: 3
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. No previous programming experience required. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1112: Introduction to Programming
Credits: 3
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students must have no previous programming experience. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1501: Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1
Student led special topic courses which vary by semester.
CS 2102: Discrete Mathematics
Credits: 3
Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include finite and infinite sets, elementary combinatorial problems, and graph theory. Development of tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems. Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112 or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2501: Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1–3
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 2910: CS Education Practicum
Credits: 1
An overview of computer science education for undergraduate students. Topics include ethics, diversity, tutoring and teaching techniques, and classroom management. Students enrolled in this course serve as a teaching assistant for a computer science course as part of their coursework.
CS 4810: Introduction to Computer Graphics
Credits: 3
Introduces the fundamentals of three-dimensional computer graphics: rendering, modeling, and animation. Students learn how to represent three-dimensional objects (modeling) and the movement of those objects over time (animation). Students learn and implement the standard rendering pipeline, defined as the stages of turning a three-dimensional model into a shaded, lit, texture-mapped two-dimensional image. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a C- or better.
CS 4980: Capstone Research
Credits: 1–3
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Students will seek out a faculty member as an advisor, and do an independent project with said advisor. Instructors can give the 3 credits across multiple semesters, if desired. This course is designed for students who are doing research, and want to use that research for their senior thesis. Note that this track could also be an implementation project, including a group-based project. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. The study is often either a thorough analysis of an abstract computer science problem or the design, implementation, and analysis of a computer system (software or hardware). Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4998: Distinguished BA Majors Research
Credits: 3
Required for Distinguished Majors completing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. An introduction to computer science research and the writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis. Prerequisites: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher and CS BA major status.
CS 6890: Industrial Applications
Credits: 1
A graduate student returning from Curricular Practical Training can use this course to claim one credit hour of academic credit after successfully reporting, orally and in writing, a summary of the CPT experience to his/her academic advisor.
CS 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students who are teaching assistants.
CS 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.

The Harold S. Morton, Jr. Award for Teaching 2017