Lanice Avery headshot
LA

Lanice Avery

Assistant Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Psychology
Office location and address
Gilmer B010
485 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Biography

Dr. Avery’s overarching research interests are at the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and mainstream media. Specifically, she is interested in Black women’s intersectional identities and how the negotiation of dominant gender ideologies and cultural stereotypes are associated with adverse psychological and sexual health outcomes. Currently, she has three lines of research that focus on understanding the ways in which gender-based psychological and sociocultural factors inform the sexual beliefs, experiences, and health practices of young Black women: (1) the health consequences associated with negotiating paradoxical expectations to perform hegemonic femininity (e.g., nurturing, submissive, communal) and stoicism (e.g., strong Black woman/superwoman stereotype); (2) the role of popular media in the socialization of disempowering gender, sex, and romantic relationship beliefs; and, (3) how the idealization of narrow feminine beauty and body standards contributes to adverse emotional (e.g., feelings of guilt and shame), cognitive (e.g., body surveillance and dissatisfaction), and behavioral (e.g., coercion, low sexual self-efficacy and assertiveness) experiences during sexual intimacy. Taken together, the primary aim of Dr. Avery’s research is to promote healthy gender and sexual development among socially marginalized and stigmatized groups. She runs the RISE (Research on Intersectionality, Sexuality, and Empowerment) Lab at the University of Virginia.

Dr. Avery is currently accepting applications for PhD students for the Community Psychology Program. She is also looking to recruit highly motivated undergraduate students for the RISELab in the Spring 2018. Interested parties should contact her directly at la4gd@virginia.edu.    

WGS 2100: Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Credits: 3
An introduction to gender studies, including the fields of women's studies, feminist studies, LGBT studies, & masculinity studies. Students will examine historical movements, theoretical issues, & contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to issues of inequality & to the intersection of gender with race, class, sexuality, & nationalism. Topics will vary according to the interdisciplinary expertise & research focus of the instructor.
PSYC 3450: The Psychology of Women and Gender
Credits: 3
This course provides a broad survey of psychological science on women and girls, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, gender socialization, love and romantic relationships, sexuality, pregnancy and motherhood, women and work, and violence against women.
PSYC 3559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 3590: Research in Psychology
Credits: 2–3
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.
WGS 4559: New Course in Women, Gender & Sexuality
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of studies of women and gender.
WGS 4620: Black Feminist Theory
Credits: 3
This course critically examines key ideas, issues, and debates in contemporary Black feminist thought. With a particular focus on Black feminist understandings of intersectionality and womanism, the course examines how Black feminist thinkers interrogate specific concepts including Black womanhood, sexual mythologies and vulnerabilities, class distinctions, colorism, leadership, crime and punishment, and popular culture.
PSYC 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.
PSYC 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.
PSYC 8998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Thesis
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PSYC 9501: Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9502: Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Graded and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
PSYC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.