KW

Katelyn Hale Wood

Assistant Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Drama
Office location and address
209 Drama Building
109 Culbreth Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2014
Biography

Katelyn Hale Wood is a performance studies scholar and theatre historian whose research engages the intersections of critical race and queer theory, gender studies, comedic performance, and sound studies. She is the author of Cracking Up: Black Feminist Comedy in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries United States  (University of Iowa Press, 2021).  She is currently working on her next book project, Sonic Intimacies: Listening to Queer Archives. Wood’s writing has also been published in Performance Matters, Theatre Topics, QED: A Journal in GLTBQ Worldmaking, Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, and the Routledge Companion to African American Theatre and Performance.

DRAM 2050: Performance and/as Theory
Credits: 3
This course surveys a broad range of theories and methodologies pertinent to the fields of Performance Studies. Each unit addresses important concepts and frameworks that help you write about, think about, and make performance art. Lecture, close reading, application exercises, and writing assignments will strengthen your theoretical vocabularies, hone your analytical writing skills and apply various tests to your own work as scholars/artists.
DRAM 3050: Making Theatre Histories
Credits: 3
How do theatre artists and scholars navigate the past and its effects on the present? This course will introduce you to important moments in theatre history, and show you how to analyze the formation of historical narratives through a variety of lenses and methods. Units are not organized chronologically, but thematically so that we may draw deeper connections across artistic practice, time, place and culture. Prerequisite: Students must have completed DRAM 2050.
DRAM 4592: Special Topics in Drama
Credits: 1–3
A directed study in dramatic literature, history, theory or criticism offered to upper-level students. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.