Keivan Esfarjani headshot
KE

Keivan Esfarjani

Associate Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Office location and address
MAE-307
130 Chemistry Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​Ecole Centrale de Paris, 1986
M.S. University of Paris VII, 1987
Ph.D. ​University of Delaware, 1991
Post-Doc ​Washington University, 1992
Biography

I did my undergraduate studies up to the Masters level in France, at the Ecole Centrale de Paris and University of Paris VII. My Phd was in condensed matter theory at the University of Delaware. My thesis was on the physics of 2D electron gas, its screening properties and quantum melting via generation of dislocations. I also studied it lattice dynamical properties and phonon lifetimes due to anharmonic 3-phonon processes. This was followed by a postdoc at Washington University. I was then assistant and then associate professor at the Institute for Materials Research of the Tohoku University in Japan, where my research focused on understanding and modeling properties of materials using first-principles methods. My research focused on cluster stability, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. We proposed for the first time a nano-diode made of n-p doped carbon nanotubes. With 2 colleagues we authored a widely read and cited book called "Computational materials science from ab into to Monte Carlo" published by Springer in 2001. My other stops were at Sharif University, UC Santa Cruz, MIT and Rutgers University before finally landing at UVa. During the past decade, I have focused my research on modeling electron and phonon transport in a variety of materials, especially thermoelectrics, which are used to convert heat to electricity. Our work on electron cloaking, first principles calculations of thermal conductivity and mean free paths distribution, observation of coherent phonons in superlattices, explanation of phonon softening and low thermal conductivity in PbTe and other IV-VI mateirals, unification of conduction and radiation in the near-field regime, and phonon hydrodynamics an graphene and 2D materials have attracted much attention from the scientific community and highlighted in news. I am presently pursuing my research interests in the fields of cooling, energy conversion and heat management. I develop computer codes and novel methodologies to perform and analyze these specific calculations.

ELEMENTS: Anharmonic formalism and codes to calculate thermal transport and phase change from first-principles calculations
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
September 01, 2021 – August 31, 2024
Phase II: High Entropy Oxide metamaterials for control of high-temperature radiative heat transfer
Source: Board of Regents of the University of Michigan
February 01, 2021 – April 30, 2022
High Entropy Oxide metamaterials for control of high-temperature radiative heat transfer
Source: Board of Regents of the University of Michigan
October 30, 2020 – May 07, 2021
MAE 2320: Dynamics
Credits: 3
Kinematic and kinetic aspects of motion modeling applied to rigid bodies and mechanisms. Focus on free-body-analysis. Use of work-energy and impulse-momentum motion prediction methods. Use of Cartesian and simple non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Rotational motion, angular momentum, and rotational kinetic-energy modeling; body mass rotational moment of inertia. Relative-velocity and acceleration. Prerequisite: MAE 2300
MAE 3140: Elements of Heat and Mass Transfer
Credits: 3
Analysis of steady state and transient heat conduction in solids with elementary analytical and numerical solution techniques; fundamentals of radiation heat transfer, including exchange among black and diffuse gray surfaces; free and forced convective heat transfer with applications of boundary layer theory and an introduction to mass transfer by diffusion using the heat-mass transfer analogy. Prerequisite: MAE 3210.
MAE 3420: Computational Methods in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 3
Introduces numerical modeling concepts used in engineering simulation tools like computational fluid dynamics and structural mechanics analysis software. Topics covered include discretization methods of partial differential equations, numerical solutions of linear matrix equations, and relaxation techniques for solving stiff equation sets. As part of the course, students will use Matlab, CFD, and mechanical analysis tools.
PHYS 3559: New Course in Physics
Credits: 3
Independent study supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a written report, essay, or examination. May be repeated for credit.
PHYS 3995: Research
Credits: 3
A research project on a topic in physics carried out under the supervision of a faculty member culminating in a written report. May be taken more than once. (S-SS) Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 4503: Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 3
Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in aerospace engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Third or Fourth-year standing.
MAE 4511: Mechanical Engineering Special Project
Credits: 2
Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.
MAE 4512: Mechanical Engineering Special Project
Credits: 2
Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.
PHYS 5559: New Course in Physics
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of physics
MAE 6100: Thermomechanics
Credits: 3
Review of classical thermodynamics; introduction to kinetic theory; quantum mechanical analysis of atomic and molecular structure; statistical mechanical evaluation of thermodynamic properties; chemical thermodynamics and equilibria. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
ECE 6501: Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 3
A first-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6592: Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
Credits: 1–3
Study of a specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the first-graduate-course level. May be offered on a seminar or a team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. New graduate courses are usually introduced in this form. Specific topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.
MAE 7510: Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Master's Students
Credits: 0–1
Required one-hour weekly seminar for master's students in mechanical and aerospace and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 8999 or 6594/7540 make formal presentations of their work.
MAE 8591: Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Doctoral Students
Credits: 0–1
Required one-hour weekly seminar for doctoral students in mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 9999 may make formal presentations of their work.
MAE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
MAE 8999: Master's Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 7510 seminar) and 12.
MSE 8999: Masters Degree Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MAE 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.
MSE 9999: PHD Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MAE 9999: Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 8591 seminar) and 12.
PHYS 9999: PhD Thesis Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.