John Monahan headshot
JM

John T. Monahan

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB177D
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D. Indiana University 1972
B.A. State University of New York at Stony Brook 1968
Biography

John Monahan, a psychologist, teaches and writes about how courts use behavioral science evidence, violence risk assessment, criminology and mental health law. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and serves on the National Research Council. Monahan was the founding president of the American Psychological Association's Division of Psychology and Law, and has been a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He also has been a visiting fellow at several law schools— including Harvard, Stanford, New York University, and the University of California, Berkeley—as well as at the American Academy in Rome, and at All Souls College, Oxford. He twice directed research networks for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. In 1997, he received an honorary law degree from the City University of New York.

Monahan is the author or editor of 17 books and more than 250 articles and chapters. One of his books, Social Science in Law, co-authored with Laurens Walker, is now in its eighth edition and has been translated into Chinese. Two of his other books won the Manfred Guttmacher Award of the American Psychiatric Association for outstanding research in law and psychiatry. Monahan’s work has been cited frequently by courts, including the California Supreme Court in the landmark case of Tarasoff v. Regents, and the United States Supreme Court in Barefoot v. Estelle, in which he was referred to as "the leading thinker on the issue" of violence risk assessment.

NIST Forensic Science Center of Excellence
Source: Iowa State University of Science and Technology
June 01, 2020 – May 31, 2022
Pretrial Risk Management in the Safety and Justice Challenge: Follow-Through Researc
Source: Macarthur Foundation
January 01, 2020 – December 31, 2021
AS-STAT Center of Excellence for Forensic Science
Source: Iowa State University
June 01, 2015 – June 30, 2020
Quantitative Decision Making Tools in Criminal Justice
Source: Macarthur Foundation
January 01, 2018 – June 30, 2020
PSYC 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.
PSYC 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.
LAW 7085: Social Science in Law
Credits: 3
This course deals with the uses of social science by practitioners and courts. The roots of social science in legal realism are considered, and the basic components of social science methodology are introduced. No background in methodology or statistics is necessary. Both applications in the criminal context and in civil law will be considered.
LAW 7131: Criminology
Credits: 3
This course introduces law students to the scientific study of violent crime, including factors that give rise to violence and those that may account for the remarkable decline in violence in recent years.
PSYC 7559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9262: Current Issues in Forensic Science
Credits: 3
This seminar will examine the legal, scientific, and the practical questions raised by the use of forensic evidence in our legal system, by bringing in a series of leading scholars, lawyers, judges, and researchers to present cutting edge work.
LAW 9279: Current Issues in Law and Psychological Science
Credits: 3
This seminar will examine the legal and scientific questions raised by the use of psychological evidence in the courtroom.
LAW 9302: Criminal Justice Policy
Credits: 3
This seminar will explore current debates about how to best improve our criminal justice system. The focus will be on concrete research projects to improve criminal justice outcomes in Virginia. Students will learn how to conduct policy-based research on criminal justice problems, and students will each choose projects and write research papers studying possible reforms.
PSYC 9559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.