Jason Johnston headshot
JJ

Jason S. Johnston

Professor
Director
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB302P
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D. University of Michigan 1984
J.D. University of Michigan 1981
A.B. Dartmouth College 1978
Biography

Law and economics expert Jason Scott Johnston joined the Virginia Law faculty in 2010 and serves as the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law . He formerly served as the the Nicholas E. Chimicles Research Professor in Business Law and Regulation at Virginia Law, and the Robert G. Fuller, Jr. Professor of Law and director of the Program on Law, Environment and Economy at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Johnston’s scholarship has examined subjects ranging from natural resources law to torts and contracts. He has published dozens of articles in law journals, such as the Yale Law Journal, and in peer-reviewed economics journals, such as the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization. He is currently working on a book that critically analyzes the foundations of global warming law and policy, a series of articles on the economics of regulatory science and another series of articles on various aspects of the law and economics of consumer protection. He has served on the Board of Directors of the American Law and Economics Association, on the National Science Foundation’s Law and Social Science grant review panel, and on the Board of the Searle Civil Justice Institute. He won Penn Law’s Robert A. Gorman Award for Teaching Excellence in 2003.

After earning his A.B. from Dartmouth College and both his J.D. and Ph.D. (economics) from the University of Michigan, Johnston clerked for Judge Gilbert S. Merritt on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. He then taught at Vermont Law School and Vanderbilt Law School before joining Penn’s faculty. He has been a visiting professor or held fellowship appointments at Yale Law School, the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, the American Academy in Berlin and the Property and Environment Research Center.

LAW 6002: Contracts
Credits: 4
This course examines the legal obligations that attach to promises made in a business contract or otherwise, including the remedies that may be available for promises that are not kept. The course examines the legal requirements for enforceable contracts, including consideration, consent and conditions, and the effect of fraud, mistake, unconscionability, and impossibility.
LAW 6007: Torts
Credits: 4
The course examines liability for civil wrongs that do not arise out of contract. It explores three standards of conduct: liability for intentional wrongdoing, negligence, and liability without fault, or strict liability, and other issues associated with civil liability, such as causation, damages, and defenses. Battery, medical malpractice, products liability, and tort reform will also be covered.
LAW 7155: Topics in Banking and Financial Regulation
Credits: 3
The goal of this course is to give students a basic understanding of the law and economics of financial regulation.
LAW 7163: Legislation and Regulation
Credits: 3–4
Legislation and Regulation is an introduction to lawmaking in the modern administrative state. It will examine the way Congress and administrative agencies adopt binding rules of law (statutes and regulations, respectively) and the way that implementing institutions -- courts and administrative agencies -- interpret and apply these laws.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9321: Capitalism and Socialism (YR)
Credits: 1
This course is the 1st half of a year-long seminar about the defining elements of capitalism versus socialism as economic systems -- both capitalism and socialism in theory, and the two systems in actual historical realization. The course will then focus on the compatibility of capitalism and socialism with alternative political systems (e.g. representative democracy versus autocracy and dictatorship).
LAW 9322: Capitalism and Socialism (YR)
Credits: 1
This course is the 2nd half of a year-long seminar about the defining elements of capitalism versus socialism as economic systems -- both capitalism and socialism in theory, and the two systems in actual historical realization.