Julie Bargmann headshot
JB

Julie L. Bargmann

Professor
Unit: School of Architecture
Department: Department of Landscape Architecture
Office location and address
Campbell Hall 419
110 Bayly Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
BS, Carnegie-Mellon University
MLA, Harvard University
Biography

Julie Bargmann is internationally recognized as an innovative designer in building regenerative landscapes and with interdisciplinary design education. In both academic explorations as well explorations at her design practice, Bargmann's on-going research continues to excavate the creative potential of degraded landscapes. Her graduate design studios and courses focus on the design potential for productive futures of fallow cities. Bargmann teaches critical site-seeing as a means to reveal multiple site histories, giving legible form to complex processes, offering renewed relationships for communities in tired and toxic surroundings. Applying this research at her small design practice, projects at the D.I.R.T. studio explore past and present industrial operations and urban processes in relationship to ecological systems, cultural constructs and emerging technologies. From closed quarries to abandoned coal mines, fallow factories and urban railyards, Bargmann joins teams of architects, artists, engineers, historians and scientists to imagine the next evolution of these working landscapes. Along with a degree in sculpture from Carnegie-Mellon University, Bargmann earned a masters in landscape architecture at Harvard Graduate School of Design followed by a Fellowhsip at the American Academy in Rome. Bargmann's work was awarded the National Design Award by Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt Museum. TIME, CNN and Newsweek, along with national and international design publications have recognized Bargmann as leading the next generation in making a difference for design and the environment.

ZFOR 3506: International Study
Placeholder course for students studying abroad
LAR 5590: Faculty Research Seminar
Credits: 1–3
Affords students opportunities to participate in specific faculty's advance research projects.
LAR 5993: Advanced Independent Research
Credits: 1–3
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
LAR 6222: Planted Form and Function II
Credits: 3
This course builds on LAR 6221, shifting emphasis from plant description & identification to making design propositions using plants. Lectures alternate with short planting design exercises & research into creating plant palettes for different site conditions.Students learn how planting designs move through various stages of the design from conceptual, to schematic, to design development, &construction documentation. Prerequisite:LAR 6221
ALAR 7010: Research Studio 1
Credits: 6
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Prerequisite: ARCH 6020 or LAR 6020.
LAR 7210: EcoTech III
Credits: 4
Advanced level of ground manipulation + water integrated with ecological principles and engineering applications in the area of urban watershed management. Topics include urban hydrology & soils, storm water management & low impact development techniques, as well as constructed wetlands & stream restoration. Prerequisite:Must be enrolled in ALAR 7010 Studio or taken LAR 6210, or with permission of instructor.
LAR 7213: EcoTech III
Credits: 3
Advanced level of ground manipulation + water integrated with ecological principles and engineering applications in the area of urban watershed management. Topics include urban hydrology & soils, storm water management & low impact development techniques, as well as constructed wetlands & stream restoration. Prerequisite:Must be enrolled in ALAR 7010 Studio or taken LAR 6210, or with permission of instructor.
LAR 7214: EcoTech IV
Credits: 3
Illuminating course looking at earthwork, and construction that integrates the principles of water and land into the studio, with an emphasis in self remediation, bioengineering, living systems and management.Typological library of solutions.
LAR 7224: Planted Form and Function III
Credits: 3
Urban forests are a consequence of a non-planned decision. They are an addition of independent interventions through the history of the city. The objective of the course will be to rethink urban forests taking as a base the existing reality, reviewing its history, but also learning from the original forest to propose new typologies of design where city and trees will share the same objective: working together with complexity and efficacy.
LAR 7310: Planted Form
Credits: 3
PLANTED FORM explores the power of plants to make extra-ordinary sensory experiences and to form socio-ecological performative spaces. It is offered as an Advanced Elective, one of a set required courses to attain an MLA. An extensive and specific vegetation vocabulary becomes a design catalog of plant architecture and planted form lexicons.
LAR 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor .
ALAR 8010: Research Studio 2
Credits: 6
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Part one of a two part comprehensive design sequence. Prerequisite: ARCH 7020 or LAR 7020.
LAR 8020: Foundation Studio IV
Credits: 6
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Typical projects include brownfields, urban landscape infrastructure, and sustainable designs. Prerequisite: ALAR 8010
LAR 8800: Teaching Experience
Credits: 3
Involves serving as a teaching assistant for a course, with teaching assignments coordinated by the chair. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
LAR 8993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture faculty approval of topic.