Justin Hopkins headshot
JH

Justin J. Hopkins

Associate Professor
Unit: Darden School of Business
Department: Darden Graduate School of Business
Office location and address
FOB 192D
90 Darden Blvd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S., MPAcc, Montana State University
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Biography

Justin Hopkins is an assistant professor in the Accounting area at the Darden School of Business. His research interests include the effects of regulation on financial reporting, governance and economic outcomes. He teaches accounting in the first year core as well as a first year elective on financial reporting. In the past, he has taught an elective on financial statement analysis.

Prior to joining faculty at Darden, Hopkins obtained his Ph.D. from the Kenan-Flagler School of Business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he taught an elective on the interaction of public policy and accounting. He has worked as an auditor for Ernst & Young LLP as well as consulted to the Justice Department and Asian Development Bank. He is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from the Dominican Republic.

Originally from Montana, Hopkins is happy to be living close to the mountains in Charlottesville with his wife and three sons.

LAW 6100: Accounting: Understanding and Analyzing Financial Statements
Credits: 2
This course is the first half of the combined four-credit Accounting/Corporate Finance course. This course provides an understanding of the concepts of financial accounting and published financial statements.
GBUS 7272: Accounting for Managers
Credits: 3
As the language of business and the cornerstone of the financial capital markets, accounting provides terminology, frameworks, and concepts with which to understand and analyze the financial consequences of business activities. As these activities have become increasingly complex and global, the task of presenting timely, relevant, and reliable financial information to interested internal and external users has become more challenging. Prerequisites: Restricted to Darden students.
GBUS 7276: Accounting for Managers - Part II
Credits: 2
As the language of business and the cornerstone of the financial capital markets, accounting provides terminology, frameworks, and concepts with which to understand and analyze the financial consequences of business activities. As these activities have become increasingly complex and global, the task of presenting timely, relevant, and reliable financial information to interested internal and external users has become more challenging.
GBUS 7601: Financial Reporting
Credits: 2
This course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive conceptual and applied understanding of our society's accounting and financial reporting system and an in-depth look at the numerous factors that managers and executives must consider as they confront complex and difficult financial accounting and reporting issues. Students will examine significant financial accounting and reporting issues from both a rigorous theoretical perspective and an informed practical perspective. Students will explore such traditional issues as revenue recognition, inventory valuation, and leases, and such contemporary issues as mergers and acquisitions, intangibles, and financial derivatives. Although the primary focus of the course will be on accounting and reporting practices in the United States, students will also address selected differences between U.S. accounting standards and international accounting standards. How the major accounting scandals that have occurred in recent years have affected the financial reporting process and those who have the responsibility for insuring the accuracy of a company's published financial statements will also be addressed. [l1] By the conclusion of this course, students should be reasonably proficient at understanding, interpreting, and analyzing the information contained in corporate financial statements and their related footnotes, and also be able to assess the overall quality of a company's financial reporting, identify the critical accounting policies, and make an assessment regarding the reasonableness of those policies and their supporting estimates and judgments.