James Groves headshot
JG

James F. Groves

Associate Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Engineering and Society
Office location and address
351 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
​B.S.E. cum laude, Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Duke University, 1990
​M.S. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, 1992
​Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 1998
Biography

James Groves has scholarly interests in the areas of engineering education and materials science. While working on his Ph.D., he co-invented directed vapor deposition technology and subsequently co-founded Directed Vapor Technologies International. In the area of materials science his greatest interest lies in the use of materials for sustainable energy solutions.

For more than a decade, Dr. Groves administered distance learning in UVA’s engineering school, serving two years as Associate Dean for Online Innovation. Those administrative efforts have translated into broad university adoption of a set of technology solutions that he initially conceived of and designed. They have also allowed the engineering school to now place among the top 15 in multiple rankings of online graduate engineering programs.

Dr. Groves was founder of Engineers PRODUCED in Virginia, an initiative which explored the use of state-of-the-art online communication and collaboration solutions for the delivery of undergraduate education to underserved communities. The PRODUCED program demonstrated a strong ability to attract non-traditional, first generation, and low and moderate income students. The program also demonstrated how engineering corporations and higher education could work together for collaborative preparation of students for the workforce, educating and ultimately employing students in their home communities.

Dr. Groves now focuses his efforts upon undergraduate education in the multidisciplinary area of leadership, design, and value(s). Working with collaborators, he has developed a simple, structured framework for engineering design and project management. He teaches students how that framework can be used to guide not only the design of engineering products but also the management of a broader array of professional projects. He also helps students to consider how alignment of their personal values with their project and design activities can increase their opportunity to make a positive impact upon the world.

Engineering Design Process Portfolio Scoring Rubric
Source: University Of Maryland
September 01, 2011 – August 31, 2015
Preparing for an Engineering Design Process Portfolio Scoring Rubric
Source: The Kern Family Foundation
November 15, 2011 – August 31, 2014
EN-DO Providing Undergraduate Connections to Engineering Education
Source: Central Virginia Community College
June 15, 2008 – May 31, 2014
EN-DO Engineers PRODUCED in Virginia
Source: Virginia Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission
December 01, 2009 – December 31, 2013
Engineer's PRODUCED in Virginia
Source: Virginia Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission
November 01, 2010 – October 28, 2013
EN-DO Research Involving Design, Innovation and Invention Experiences for Teachers (Research DIIET)
Source: University Of Maryland
October 01, 2007 – April 15, 2013
ENGR 1520: Explorations in Engineering
Credits: 3
This course introduces students to engineering, including the role of engineers in modern society, engineering subdisciplines, & methods used by engineers to solve problems. A key component is a hands-on design-build project in which students work in small teams to develop a solution to a problem. This activity culminates in demonstration of a design solution prototype. Students should be able to make clearer choices when deciding a career path. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
ENGR 1559: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 3
Considers engineering practices and principles in their local and global context. Topics vary based upon student and faculty interest.
GSVS 2050: Sustainable Energy Systems
Credits: 3
Sustainable energy is not just about the component technologies, it's about how they fit together to create a complete energy system. Put another way, the individual technologies are only pieces of a much larger puzzle. In this class we will study the science and technology behind those energy "pieces" in an attempt to better define at least their present day shapes. We will then explore ways of assembling them into total energy systems. Prerequisite: High school level physics and chemistry.
STS 2050: Introduction to Sustainable Energy Systems
Credits: 3
This course investigates a major source of human impact upon the Earth - energy consumption to fuel human activity. The course a) provides a cross-disciplinary perspective on the challenge of human-centered energy use, b) explains the historical origins of today's energy systems, c) describes current energy systems, d) examines the components of sustainable energy systems, and e) considers keys to their deployment.
MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science
Credits: 3
The field of Materials Science drives technological innovations underlying all engineering fields. This course provides a scientific foundation to promote a rigorous understanding of materials from an atomistic to macroscopic viewpoint. Material systems (polymers, metals, ceramics, and electronic) are developed sequentially to provide a framework to explain the fundamental, physical origins of observable and important macro scale properties.
STS 2500: Science and Technology in Social and Global Context
Credits: 3
This course invites students to explore the implications of STS core concepts within a specific topical or disciplinary area, drawing out the implications of STS 1500 in depth. The course explores the social and global context of engineering, science and technology. Although writing and speaking skills are emphasized, more attention is given to course content and the students' analytical abilities. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or an equivalent STS course.
GSVS 2559: New Course in Global Environments and Sustainability
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Environments and Sustainability, in Global Studies.
ENGR 2595: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–4
Special Topics in Engineering.
GSVS 3010: Sustainable Design Thinking I
Credits: 3
This course is a collaborative design thinking experience that emphasizes sustainability. Students work in self-selected teams through the first half of the design process, identifying a challenge and conceiving of a solution. The course emphasizes sustainability, multidisciplinary teamwork, and client-stakeholder engagement. Students define their own challenge space, conceive of their own solution, and articulate solution requirements.
GSVS 3020: Sustainable Design Thinking II
Credits: 3
This course is a collaborative design thinking experience that focus on sustainability. Students work in self-selected teams through the second half of the design process, prototyping and testing a sustainability-related concept and articulating a robust description of a solution ready for transfer to end-users. The course emphasizes multidisciplinary teamwork and client-stakeholder engagement.
ENGR 3501: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 3
Special topics in engineering will vary based upon student and faculty interests.
GSVS 3559: New Course in Global Environments and Sustainability
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Environments and Sustainability, in Global Studies.
ENGR 4010: Multidisciplinary Design and Development I
Credits: 1–3
A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: 4th year standing.
ENGR 4020: Multidisciplinary Design and Development II
Credits: 1–3
A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: ENGR 4010; 4th year standing.
ENGR 4595: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Advance projects course to be taken in parallel with STS 4010, 4020, or can be used for an advanced undergraduate course on a topic not covered in the course offerings. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ENGR 4599: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
MSE 4960: Special Project in Materials Science and Engineering
Credits: 1–6
A fourth year project in MSE, under the supervision of a faculty member, is designed to give undergraduate students an application of principles learned in the classroom. The work may be experimental or computational, and the student is expected to become proficient in techniques used to process, characterize, or model materials. The project should make use of design principles in the solution of a problem. Six hours in lab per week, notebook. Prerequisite: 4th year standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor.
GSVS 4993: Independent Study in Environments and Sustainability
Credits: 1–6
This course is an independent study to be arranged by student in consultation with faculty.
STS 5500: Topics in Technology and Society
Credits: 1–3
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course relates technology or engineering to the broader culture. The specific subject will differ from time to time.
MSE 8999: Masters Degree Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
ENGR 9997: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
Graduate Teaching Instruction for doctoral students.
MSE 9999: PHD Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

Hartfield-Jefferson Scholars Teaching Prize - For excellence in undergraduate teaching and curriculum development in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia. Jefferson Scholars Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. 2015

Leadership in Education Award - For the use of technology to promote and enhance educational opportunities in southern Virginia through the Engineers PRODUCED in Virginia program. Southern Piedmont Technology Council, Danville, VA. 2011

Outstanding Young Engineering Graduate Award - To recognize alumni who have made significant achievements and contributions in the early phase of their careers. 2003