Joanne Dugan headshot
JD

Joanne Bechta Dugan

Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Office location and address
300 Rice Hall
85 Engineers Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
​B.A. in Mathematics and Computer Science, La Salle College
​M.S. in Electrical Engineering, Duke University
​Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, Duke University
Biography

Joanne Bechta Dugan is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Director of the Computer Engineering Programs at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on probabilistic assessment of the dependability of computer-based systems. She has developed the dynamic fault tree model, which extends the applicability of fault tree analysis to computer systems. Current work focuses on the development of a new sequence of interdisciplinary courses in robotics, including autonomous vehicles, humanoids and small robots for social applications.

She and her colleagues and students developed the dynamic fault tree model, which has been used for reliability analysis and probabilistic risk assessment by industry, academic and government researchers and contractors. A software tool that embodies this work (called Galileo) was developed by researchers at the University of Virginia and has been used by NASA and its contractors for many years.

In 2000 she was named a Fellow of the IEEE, cited for “contributions to dependability analysis of fault tolerant computer systems.”

In January 2000 she received the IEEE Reliability Society Award, “recognizing the contributions of new techniques for fault tree analysis, including theoretical advances, practical application and technology transfer through software tool development.”

In 2003 she received the Harriet B. Rigas Award for outstanding woman engineering educator, given by IEEE Education and Computer Societies.

In 2014 she was awarded the Hartfield-Jefferson Scholars Teaching Prize, 2014. This prize is awarded annually to faculty in SEAS who exhibit strong commitment to teaching. In the same year she was awarded the Harold S. Morton, Jr. Award for Teaching, for dedication to the education of undergraduate students in SEAS and outstanding teaching in the school’s core courses and the Outstanding teacher award given by the ECE Department.

Dugan was recognized by her undergrad alma mater with the 2016 IT leadership award, in recognition of leadership in the field of information technology, positive impact on the community and commitment to LaSallian values.

She has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Systems Engineering and Mathematics and has advised PhD students in computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering and systems engineering.

CU-Laboratory School for Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
Source: Virginia Secretary of Education
February 01, 2013 – September 01, 2013
ECE 1501: Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering
Credits: 1
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.
ECE 2330: Digital Logic Design
Credits: 3
Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Six laboratory assignments. Cross-listed as CS 2330.
CS 3501: Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1–3
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
ECE 3501: Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 1–5
A third-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 4502: Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 1–4
A fourth-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 4550: Applied Research and Design Lab
Credits: 2
A lab-based course that provides a hands-on way to learn about new developments in electrical and computer engineering fields. Topics include technologies or application areas that relate to ongoing design and research activities of faculty and students.
SYS 4582: Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Detailed study of a selected topic determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As specified for each offering.
ENGR 4595: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Advance projects course to be taken in parallel with STS 4010, 4020, or can be used for an advanced undergraduate course on a topic not covered in the course offerings. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ECE 4908: Electrical Engineering Projects
Credits: 1–3
Under faculty supervision, students plan a project of at least one semester's duration, conduct the analysis or design and test, and report on the results. If this work is to be the basis for an undergraduate thesis, the course should be taken no later than the seventh semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4980: Capstone Research
Credits: 1–3
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Students will seek out a faculty member as an advisor, and do an independent project with said advisor. Instructors can give the 3 credits across multiple semesters, if desired. This course is designed for students who are doing research, and want to use that research for their senior thesis. Note that this track could also be an implementation project, including a group-based project. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. The study is often either a thorough analysis of an abstract computer science problem or the design, implementation, and analysis of a computer system (software or hardware). Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4998: Distinguished BA Majors Research
Credits: 3
Required for Distinguished Majors completing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. An introduction to computer science research and the writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis. Prerequisites: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher and CS BA major status.
STS 5500: Topics in Technology and Society
Credits: 1–3
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course relates technology or engineering to the broader culture. The specific subject will differ from time to time.
CPE 6190: Computer Engineering Perspectives
Credits: 1–3
This course is designed for first year Graduate students in the Computer Engineering Program to help orient new graduate students to the current research topics, available research tools, software and systems, publishing systems, and other topics to help new students become successful. Prerequisite: CpE grduate student or instructor permission
SYS 6465: Robots and Humans
Credits: 3
Interactions between robots and humans are influenced by form, function and expectations. Quantitative techniques evaluate performance of specific tasks and functions. Qualitative techniques are used to evaluate the interaction and to understand expectations and perceptions of the human side of the interaction. Students use humanoid robots to develop and evaluate interactions within a specific application context.
ECE 6501: Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 3
A first-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 6550: Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Credits: 1–3
A non-graded lab-based course that provides a hands-on way to learn about new developments in electrical and computer engineering fields. Topics include technologies or application areas that relate to ongoing design and research activities of faculty and students.
SYS 6581: Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Detailed study of a selected topic, determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Offered as required.
CPE 6890: Industrial Applications
Credits: 1–3
Students register for this course to complement an industry work experience. Topics focus on the application of engineering principles, analysis, methods and best practices in an industrial setting. A final report is required.
CPE 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member
CS 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CPE 7995: Supervised Project Research
Credits: 1–6
Formal record of student commitment to project research for a Masters degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CS 7995: Supervised Project Research
Credits: 3
Formal record of student commitment to project research for the Master of Computer Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CS 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students who are teaching assistants.
CPE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For Computer Engineering Master's Students who are teaching assistants.
ECE 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CPE 8999: Non-Topical Research, Master's Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty adviser. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
CPE 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
ECE 9999: Dissertation
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CPE 9999: Non-Topical Research, Doctoral Dissertation
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty adviser. May be repeated as necessary.