Josh Bowers headshot
JB

Josh Bowers

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB175B
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. New York University School of Law 2001
B.A. University of Wisconsin 1995
Biography

Josh Bowers joined the law faculty in 2008 as an associate professor of law. His primary teaching and research interests are in the areas of criminal law, criminal procedure, criminal justice theory, and constitutional law. Bowers has written numerous articles, essays, and book chapters on police and prosecutorial discretion, plea bargaining, misdemeanor enforcement and adjudication, drug courts, life without parole, capital punishment, grand juries and the right to counsel. His work has been published in several books and journals, including the Columbia Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the UCLA Law Review and the Stanford Law Review.

Bowers attended New York University School of Law, where he was a notes editor of the New York University Law Review and graduated Order of the Coif. After law school, he clerked for Judge Dennis Jacobs of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He practiced law as an associate for Morvillo, Abramowitz, Grand, Iason & Silberberg P.C., a boutique white-collar criminal defense firm, and also as a staff attorney for the Bronx Defenders, a community-based public defender organization. From 2006-2008, he was a Bigelow Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School.

LAW 6003: Criminal Law
Credits: 3
This course explores the basic principles of Anglo-American criminal law, including the constituent elements of criminal offenses, the necessary predicates for criminal liability, the major concepts of justification and excuse, and the conditions under which offenders can be liable for attempt. Major emphasis is placed on the structure and interpretation of modern penal codes.
LAW 7179: Race and Criminal Justice
Credits: 3
Course description: This course examines the role of race in the criminal justice system, and the role of law in both causing and countering racial injustice in that system. The course will proceed through each major stage of the criminal justice process -- policing, prosecution, adjudication, and punishment -- identifying important racial issues that arise at each stage and exploring how the law creates and responds to those issues.
LAW 7608: Plea Bargaining (SC)
Credits: 1
This short course will focus on plea bargaining and the guilty plea system in modern America.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8816: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8817: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9142: Contemporary Debates in Criminal Law
Credits: 3
This seminar is intended to expose students to the most fundamental and provocative doctrinal, analytical, empirical, and philosophical debates that scholars have faced over the past quarter century.
LAW 9228: Advanced Topics in Law and Public Service (YR)
This is the first semester in a seminar intended to allow Fellows in the Law & Public Service Program to share research and writing on public-interest topics. Prerequisite: 3rd-Year Law
LAW 9229: Advanced Topics in Law and Public Service (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester in a seminar intended to allow Fellows in the Law & Public Service Program to share research and writing on public-interest topics.
LAW 9280: Rule of Law and Threats to It
Credits: 3
This seminar will examine the rule of law in theory and practice. What is the rule of law and why (if at all) is it valuable? We will take up such questions by reading the philosophical literature on the rule of law and and by looking at case studies of situations where many have seen the rule of law to be under threat.