Hillary Bart-Smith headshot
HB

Hilary Bart-Smith

Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Office location and address
Mechanical & Aerospace Building, Rm 311
Austin, Texas 73301
Education
B.S. ​Mechanical Engineering, University of Glasgow in Glasgow, Scotland
Ph.D. ​​Engineering Sciences, Harvard University
Biography

Professor Bart-Smith joined the University of Virginia faculty in the fall of 2002. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland and her PhD degree in Engineering Sciences from Harvard University. Dr. Bart-Smith came to UVA from Princeton University where she worked at the Princeton Materials Institute with A.G. Evans. Since joining the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering faculty at the University of Virginia in 2002, Bart-Smith has founded the Multifunctional Materials and Structures Laboratory and the Bio-inspired Engineering Research Laboratory.

Professor Bart-Smith’s research group is studying the mechanics of lightweight lattice truss structures for their use as load-bearing structures and impact amelioration systems as well as their possible morphing and thermal management capabilities. Secondly, Bart-Smith and her colleagues are using the principles of static determinacy and tensegrity–with their superior mechanical properties such as stiffness and strength–to develop a three-dimensional morphing foil with the propulsive and control capabilities of a manta ray. Through collaborations scientists and engineers at the National Institute of Aerospace, NASA Langley and a grant through the Rising Stars Fellowship program, Bart-Smith is also involved in the area of deployable space structures. This work is also being expanded to look at the problem of morphing wings in aircraft and micro air vehicles. Finally, she is studying the mechanics of electro-active polymers to explore their possible use as artificial muscles within a device with biomimetric properties (those that mimic a biochemical process). These material systems are also being adapted for sensing technology.

Bio-Inspired Renewable Energy (BIRE) for Highly-efficient Low-cost Riverine Hydrokinetics
Source: U.S. Department of Energy
May 01, 2021 – November 01, 2021
Packard Foundation Fellowships for Science & Engineering
Source: The David & Lucile Packard Foundation
November 01, 2003 – October 31, 2021
EN-MAE Bio-Inspired Flexible Propulsors for Fast, Efficient Swimming:What Physics are we missing?
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
May 01, 2016 – September 30, 2019
EN-MAE Bio-Inspired Flexible Propulsors for Fast, Efficient Swimming: What Physics are we missing?
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
July 01, 2014 – September 30, 2017
EN-MAE MEMS Based Gaseous Flow Sensor
Source: Hoffer Flow Controls, Inc.
September 01, 2014 – December 31, 2016
A Micro-cellular Solids Approach to Thermo-Structural Materials with Controlled Architectures
Source: U.S. DOD - Army
September 24, 2010 – August 30, 2016
Cellular Structures for Penetration Mitigation: Analysis & Equipment
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
June 21, 2012 – July 31, 2015
Towards a Mission Configurable Stealth Underwater Batoid
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
May 19, 2008 – October 31, 2014
Study of the Structural Response of Curved Sandwich Panel Columns
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
March 22, 2006 – October 31, 2013
MAE 4610: Machine Design I
Credits: 3
Coverage of the design process including project management, specifications, budgeting and case histories, Conceptual, preliminary, and detailed design phases. Technical proposal and report preparation and technical presentations. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester long mechanical design projects selected to illustrate the design process. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.
MAE 4620: Machine Design II
Credits: 3
A continuation of MAE 4610 that applies the design process to projects. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester-long design projects, including oral presentations and written reports. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.
MAE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
MAE 8999: Master's Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 7510 seminar) and 12.
MAE 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.
MAE 9999: Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 8591 seminar) and 12.