Giovanni Zangari headshot
GZ

Giovanni Zangari

Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Office location and address
Wilsdorf Hall 320
395 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​Politecnico di Milano, 1991
M.S. ​Politecnico di Milano, 1991
Ph.D. ​Politecnico di Torino, 1995
Post-Doc ​Carnegie Mellon, Electrical Engineering, 1995-1998
Biography

My research interests include the growth by electrochemical deposition and the characterization of metallic, semiconductive and dielectric films for advanced applications in magnetics, microelectronics, actuation and energy conversion, the development of novel electrochemical processes for the practical fabrication of sensors and devices, and the investigation and optimization of electrochemical methods for the synthesis of nanostructures. An overarching theme of his research is also the fundamental understanding of electrochemical deposition phenomena and how atomistic processes determine microstructure and properties of materials.

Prediction and Control of Atomic Ordering in Electrodeposited Binary Alloy Films: Direct Synthesis of L10 Magnetic Phases
Source: U.S. Department Of Energy - Chicago
September 01, 2018 – August 31, 2022
Integrated Nanotube/Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Nanosheets for Water Splitting Applications: Enabling Long-term Human Activity on Mars - Fellowship on behalf of Lee Kendall Year 2
Source: Virginia Space Grant Consortium
September 01, 2021 – August 31, 2022
Development and Theory for a Solid State Battery
Source: Omega Energy Systems, LLC
April 01, 2018 – September 30, 2021
Integrated Nanotube/Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Nanosheets for Water Splitting Applications: Enabling Long-term Human Activity on Mars - Lee Kendall
Source: Virginia Space Grant Consortium
August 01, 2020 – July 31, 2021
EN-MSE Electrochemical Synthesis of Structurally Ordered, Magnetic Pt-Based Alloys for Magnetic Microdevices
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Math. & Physical Sciences
September 01, 2012 – August 31, 2017
Novel Catalysts for Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Conversion
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Math. & Physical Sciences
August 15, 2012 – August 31, 2016
Electrochemical Underpotential Co-deposition of Binary and Ternary Alloys: Towards a Novel Manufacturing Technology
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Engineering
September 01, 2011 – August 31, 2016
EN-MAE Microfoluidic MEMS: Low Voltage Electrowetting on Dielectric
Source: Virginia Space Grant Consortium
June 01, 2014 – May 31, 2016
EN-MSE Tests and Analyses of Magnetic FIlms
Source: Scot Industries
October 01, 2013 – November 30, 2015
Fundamental Studies of Electrowetting on Tailored Surfaces
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Engineering
September 01, 2010 – August 31, 2014
Hydrogen Recombination and Control in Iron Cathode Alkaline Battery Systems
Source: Encell Technology, Inc.
December 09, 2011 – December 31, 2013
Phase I - Powder Synthesis and Composition and Phase II - Casting - Scope of Work for OMEGA
Source: Omega Energy Systems, LLC
March 01, 2013 – May 31, 2013
Tailoring Magnetization Dynamics of Electroplated Fe-Co Films by Doping with Rare Earths and Heavy Transition Metals
Source: Western Digital Technologies, Inc.
November 01, 2011 – March 31, 2013
MSE 3060: Structures and Defects of Materials
Credits: 3
Basic materials structure concepts are developed, include bonding and crystallography. The structure-property paradigm is illustrated through discussion of the frequently anisotropic properties of crystalline solids, such as elastic moduli, thermal expansion, magnetic properties, and the piezoelectric effect. Descriptions of important defects in crystalline solids, from point defects, to dislocations, to interfaces are introduced along with the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern their interactions and roles during materials processing, such as annealing, aging, and sintering. Applications are made to a broad range of materials, from structural alloys to so-called "smart materials" used in sensors and actuators. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 and APMA 2120 or instructor permission.
MSE 3670: Materials for Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Applications
Credits: 3
The course introduces the basics of materials interactions with electrons and electromagnetic radiation and describes the classes of materials that exhibit useful electronic, optical, magnetic, and superconductive properties. Particular attention will be devoted to the intrinsic (structure, chemistry) and extrinsic (processing, microstructure) material features that determine these properties. Examples of application of such materials in commercial electronic systems in common use are discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 recommended.
MSE 4055: Nanoscale Science & Technology
Credits: 3
Covers the basic phenomena exhibited by material structures at the scale of one hundred nanometers of less, and the applications to technology. The goal of the course is to provide students with fundamental physical principles which can be used to analyze nanoscale phenomena, the assembly of nanostructures, and their characterization. Different properties: electrical, mechanical, optical, etc. will be discussed in detail on the basis of quantum mechanics and the atomistic description of solids. The description will include the behavior of clusters, nanoparticles, graphene, carbon nanotubes, nanoporous material, and examples from the natural world (DNA, membranes, cells, mineral nanostructures). Different methods of fabrication of nanostructures will be covered, from self-assembly to direct writing with electron beams. The characterization of the microstructures by different methods will be described and compared. The course will give a broad view of current and potential applications, with consideration of economic an societal aspects of the technology. Prerequisite: Exposure to Quantum Mechanics (MSE 3670, PHYS 2320, PHYS 2620, or CHEM 3610) or instructor permission.
MSE 4960: Special Project in Materials Science and Engineering
Credits: 1–6
A fourth year project in MSE, under the supervision of a faculty member, is designed to give undergraduate students an application of principles learned in the classroom. The work may be experimental or computational, and the student is expected to become proficient in techniques used to process, characterize, or model materials. The project should make use of design principles in the solution of a problem. Six hours in lab per week, notebook. Prerequisite: 4th year standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor.
MSE 6080: Chemical and Electrochemical Properties
Credits: 3
Introduces the concepts of electrode potential, double layer theory, surface charge, and electrode kinetics. These concepts are applied to subjects that include corrosion and embrittlement, energy conversion, batteries and fuel cells, electro-catalysis, electroanalysis, electrochemical industrial processes, bioelectrochemistry, and water treatment. Prerequisite: Physical chemistry course or instructor permission.
MSE 6230: Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria of Materials
Credits: 3
Emphasizes the understanding of thermal properties such as heat capacity, thermal expansion, and transitions in terms of the entropy and the other thermodynamic functions. Develops the relationships of the Gibbs and Helmholtz functions to equilibrium systems, reactions, and phase diagrams. Atomistic and statistical mechanical interpretations of crystalline and non-crystalline solids are linked to the general thermodynamical laws by the partition function. Nonequilibrium and irreversible processes in solids are discussed. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 8970: Graduate Teaching Instruction-M.S.
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
MSE 8999: Masters Degree Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
EP 8999: Master's Degree Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MSE 9970: Graduate Teaching Instruction-Ph.D.
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.
EP 9999: Ph.D. Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MSE 9999: PHD Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

Distinguished Plenary Lecture Award – Interfinish 2012 World Congress and Exhibition

Fellow of the Electrochemical Society 2011

NSF – CAREER Award 2001

Oak Ridge Associated Universities – Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award 1999