George Geis headshot
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George Samuel Geis

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB340
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. University of Chicago Law School 1998
M.B.A. University of Chicago 1998
B.S. University of California at Berkeley 1992
Biography

George Geis joined the faculty in 2008, after visiting at the Law School during the 2007-08 academic year. Geis previously taught at the University of Alabama, where he received numerous teaching awards and was selected by the student body as the outstanding faculty member in 2007. He teaches contracts, corporations, agency and partnership, and corporate finance. Geis also is faculty advisor for the J.D.-MBA dual-degree program.

His research focuses on problems related to contract theory, business alliances, shareholder litigation, and other issues involving the intersection of law and business. His work has appeared in the Northwestern University Law Review, the New York University Law Review, the University of Chicago Law Review, the Virginia Law Review and many other academic journals. He is also the co-author of a book on business partnership and alliance strategies published by McGraw-Hill. Geis has taught courses as a visiting professor at the University of Chicago, the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad, India, the University of Auckland in New Zealand, and the University of Trento in Italy.

After graduating from the University of Chicago Law School, Geis spent five years as a management consultant with McKinsey & Company, where he served clients on corporate strategy, mergers, marketing and other issues. He has also worked with the law firms Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York and Munger, Tolles & Olson in Los Angeles.

LAW 6002: Contracts
Credits: 4
This course examines the legal obligations that attach to promises made in a business contract or otherwise, including the remedies that may be available for promises that are not kept. The course examines the legal requirements for enforceable contracts, including consideration, consent and conditions, and the effect of fraud, mistake, unconscionability, and impossibility.
LAW 6103: Corporations
Credits: 4
This course considers the formation and operation of corporations and compares corporations to other business forms. It examines the roles and duties of those who control businesses and the power of investors to influence and litigate against those in control. The course also addresses the special problems of closely held corporations and issues arising out of mergers and attempts to acquire firms. The course uses both new tools derived from the corporate finance and related literature and traditional tools to explore a wide range of phenomena and transactions associated with the modern business enterprise.
LAW 6113: Introduction to Law and Business
Credits: 2
This class offers an introduction to transactional legal practice at the intersection of law and business. The course topics include initial entity formation, an overview of alternative fundraising transactions, and an examination of several other complex contracting transactions. Both legal and business considerations will be discussed.
LAW 8012: Legal Issues in Corporate Finance (Law & Business)
Credits: 3
This course examines legal issues that arise from different financing choices made by corporations, the relationship between a corporation and its investors, and how the courts have treated that relationship. Topics include firm valuation in change-of-control transactions and in bankruptcy, the rights of debt-holders and preferred stockholders, and common stockholders' claims to dividends.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8818: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8819: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9319: Advanced Topics in Law and Business
Credits: 3
This course explores cutting edge topics at the intersection of law and business with a focus on emerging business strategies, notable recent cases, and proposed regulatory reforms. The course is designed for students seeking a capstone experience in their law and business studies.