Fahad Bishara headshot
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Fahad Ahmad Bishara

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of History
Office location and address
Nau 253
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.A. University of Southern California, 2004
M.A. University of Exeter, 2006
Ph.D. Duke University, 2012
HIST 1501: Introductory Seminar in History
Credits: 3
Introduction to the study of history intended for first- and second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIME 2002: The Making of the Modern Middle East
Credits: 4
What historical processes that have shaped the Middle East of today? This course focuses on the history of a region stretching from Morocco in the West and Afghanistan in the East over the period of roughly 1500 to the present. In doing so, we examine political, social, and cultural history through the lens of "media" in translation, such as manuscripts, memoirs, maps, travel narratives, novels, films, music, internet media, and more.
HIME 2003: Economic History of the Islamic World
Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to the economic history of the Islamic World over the duration of roughly 1300 years of history. We explore ideologies, institutions, and practices of commerce in Muslim society, paying close attention to the actors, artifacts, and encounters, that gave it shape over the course of a millennium, ending with the onset of Industrial Revolution in the late 18th century.
HIST 2213: Law and Sovereignty in World History
Credits: 3
This course explores the workings of law and sovereignty in a changing world-historical landscape, mixing conceptual readings with concrete case studies across space and time. By exploring the discourses and practices of sovereignty-making across world history, we develop a more grounded approach to the issue and its contours in global politics today, from disputes over the high seas to discourses on "failed states" and interventions.
HIST 2559: New Course in General History
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIME 2559: New Course in Middle Eastern History
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 3195: Arabian Seas: Islam, Trade and Empire in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean
Credits: 3
Rather than a traditional "area studies" approach to Middle Eastern history, we will explore the region's history from its maritime frontiers: the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. We explore how nobles, merchants, slaves, sailors, and statesmen all forged the contours of a shared world, linking the economic and political histories of Arabia, Africa, South and Southeast Asia.
HIME 4501: Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History
Credits: 4
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIME 4511: Colloquium in Middle East History
Credits: 4
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topics of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIME 4993: Independent Study in Middle Eastern History
Credits: 1–3
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIST 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.
HIAF 4993: Independent Study in African History
Credits: 1–3
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member, any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIST 7001: Approaches to Historical Study
Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of historical approaches.
HIST 8999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
HIME 9025: Tutorial in the Economic and Social History of the Middle East
Credits: 3
The course comprises readings from the economic, social, and legal history of the Middle East from the early medieval period onward.
HIST 9028: Readings in Indian Ocean History
Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the historiography on the Indian Ocean in broad terms, placing it within the context of discussions on world history. While the main goal is to develop a deeper knowledge of Indian Ocean history, the bulk of the course is devoted to thinking about how historians conceptualize connectivity across watery spaces and, more fundamentally, how they deal with issues of scale and time in writing trans-regional history.
HIST 9034: Readings in Global History
Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the conversation surrounding "Global History." Global history has come to embrace broader questions of scale, connection, movement, and circulation in history. It is a methodological reflection -- a sensibility -- as much as it is a sub-field. We will think about the analytical and narrative choices we make as historians, but also about the ways we incorporate global history into course and curricular design.
HIST 9960: Readings in History
Credits: 3
This course is a graduate-level adaptation of an undergraduate course in history. The graduate-level adaption requires additional research, readings, or other academic work established by the instructor beyond the undergraduate syllabus.
HIST 9961: Supervised Reading
Credits: 3
Graduate study of the historiography of a particular topic or historical period, equivalent to a graduate-level colloquium course. Prerequisites: Approval of director of graduate studies or department chair.

European Research Commission Grant, Awarded August 2016 (as partner investigator)

Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center Research Fellowship, Awarded December 2014.

Surrency Prize, awarded annually for best article in Law and History Review.

Postdoctoral Fellowship for Transregional Research, Social Science Research Council “Inter-Asia Contexts and Connections” Program. Awarded in July 2013.

Academy Scholars Postdoctoral Fellowship, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. (Declined)

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Awarded March 2011.

Evan Frankel Humanities Fellowship, Evan Frankel Foundation, Fellowship Administered by Duke University. Awarded in December 2010. (Declined)

International Dissertation Research Fellowship, Social Science Research Council. Awarded in June 2009.

South Asia Summer Language Institute, Gujarati Program Fee Remission, Awarded June 2009.

International Pre-Dissertation Research Travel Award, Duke Graduate School. Awarded in January 2008.

Summer Research Grant, Duke University History Department. Awarded in May 2007.

Tom Fattorini Prize for Best Performance in an MA Program, Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter. Awarded in December 2006.

HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Al-Saud Award for Best MA Dissertation, Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter. Awarded in December 2006