Ellen Bassett headshot
EB

Ellen Marie Bassett

Professor
Chair, Urban & Environmental Planning
Unit: School of Architecture
Department: Department of Urban and Environmental Planning
Office location and address
Campbell Hall 231
110 Bayly Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2001
M.A., UW-Madison, 1992
M.S., UW-Madison, 1989
Biography

Ellen M. Bassett is an Associate Professor in Urban and Environmental Planning and the Chair of the department.  Her areas of research interest and expertise are land use planning and law, climate change planning, health and the built environment, and international development.  She is particularly interested in community decision-making around land and natural resources, including understanding how different societies and cultures create institutions (like property rights systems or policies) for their management. 

AR-CDH Hart Howerton Collaborative Study
Source: Hart Howerton, Ltd.
March 01, 2013 – June 01, 2015
SARC 1500: SARC Seminars
Credits: 1
SARC 1500 courses are 1-credit seminars capped at 20 first-year students, all of whom are assigned to the instructor as advisees. They are topically focused on an area identified by the faculty member; they also include a significant advising component centered on undergraduate issues (e.g., choosing a major, study abroad opportunities, undergraduate research, etc.).
PLAN 3050: Planning Methods
Credits: 3
Analyzes methods used in quantitative and qualitative investigations of urban and regional settings for planning purposes.
PLAN 3060: Law, Land and the Environment
Credits: 3
This course introduces major legal issues surrounding land-use and environmental issues, focusing on the most notable U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to land use and environmental law, as well as the legal framework for land use law and environmental law.
PLAN 4800: Professional Practice
Credits: 1–3
Structured internship experience and reporting as a reflective practitioner for ten weeks or 200 hours of experience.
PLAN 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.
PLAC 4993: Applied Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, or independent study. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAN 5205: Real Estate Affordable Housing
Credits: 3
Course examines the production of affordable housing in different real estate markets in the USA. Covers US housing policy, local and state planning parameters and the use of critical tools including tax credits, TIF, public private partnerships and equity-limiting models such as community land trusts.
PLAC 5250: Applied Real Estate
Credits: 4
The course emulates the real estate development process in a specific geographic and socio-economic setting. In this studio, students will form small teams assigned to develop a project for a specific site. The students begin with site analysis, develop a proposed "product," conduct all the key financial analyses, and identify and develop the materials that would be necessary to move the project through public approval.
PLAN 5500: Special Topics in Planning
Credits: 1–4
Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.
PLAN 5993: Applied Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Individual study directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAN 6050: Law, Land and the Environment
Credits: 3
This course examines major legal issues surrounding land use planning and environmental protection. Intended to introduce students to critical legal concepts (e.g., due process, precedent, standing) as well as the parameters set for planning by the US Constitution, key Constitutional amendments, and various statutes including main federal environmental laws. Where appropriate state level laws and cases are reviewed.
PLAC 6090: Planning Practicum
Credits: 4
This course serves as the fourth semester integrative class for the MUEP. Students work on a group project for a community client. Course entails understanding and drafting MOUs, creating concrete work plans, engaging with the public, gathering data and investigating strategies and alternatives. Final product should be a meaningful, implementable planning document for community use.
PLAN 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–4
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.
PLAN 8050: Advanced Law, Land and the Environment
Credits: 3
This course examines major legal issues surrounding land use planning & environmental protection. Intended to introduce students to critical legal concepts (e.g.,due process,precedent,standing) as well as the parameters set for planning by the US Constitution,key Constitutional amendments, & various statutes including main federal environmental laws.Where appropriate state level laws and cases are reviewed. Ph.D. students will have additional requirements.
PLAN 8999: Master's Thesis
Credits: 3–6
A thesis is optional for the Master of Urban and Environmental Planning degree. Students should begin early to explore topics and to identify potential committee members. A guideline document is available.
SARC 9998: Non-Topical Doctoral Prep
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
SARC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.