Elizabeth Fowler headshot
EF

Elizabeth Fowler

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of English
Office location and address
102 Dawson's Row
1 Dawson's Row
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Education
Ph.D. Harvard
A.M. Harvard
A.B. Brown
Biography

Elizabeth Fowler is a literary scholar with a background in architectural practice. Her book project, The Flesh of Art: Poetry and the Built Environment, is nearing completion and she is working on the texts and material cultures of prayer, a project stimulated by teaching “world prayer” and “world heritage” in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas on several academic voyages around the world. Her work concerns language in the context of other cultural practices; Literary Character (Cornell, 2003) considers how literary representations of the person draw upon those in law, philosophy, and economics. She is a General Editor of the Oxford Collected Works of Edmund Spenser (in progress), for which she has made a penitential pilgrimage with Prof. Victor Luftig to teach “literature and place” in Galway and Dublin, Ireland, many years during January term. She works with undergraduate and graduate students in medieval and early modern literature; lyric and narrative poetry in English across time (especially Chaucer, Spenser, Heaney); literature and architecture; the history of English landscape; theories of spatiality, material culture, devotional poetics, book history, feminism, political thought. She has an abiding interest in what people do with poems in real places.

ENGL 3001: History of Literatures in English I
Credits: 3
A two-semester, chronological survey of literatures in English from their beginnings to the present day. Studies the formal and thematic features of different genres in relation to the chief literary, social, and cultural influences upon them. ENGL 3810 covers the period up to 1800; ENGL 3820, the period 1800 to the present. Required of all majors. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu.
ENGL 3161: Chaucer I
Credits: 3
Studies selected Canterbury Tales and other works, read in the original. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3510: Studies in Medieval Literature
Credits: 3
Topics vary. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENMD 3559: New Course in Medieval Literature
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Medieval Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3810: History of Literatures in English I
Credits: 3
A two-semester, chronological survey of literatures in English from their beginnings to the present day. Studies the formal and thematic features of different genres in relation to the chief literary, social, and cultural influences upon them. ENGL 3810 covers the period up to 1800; ENGL 3820, the period 1800 to the present. Required of all majors. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu.
ENMD 4500: Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I
Credits: 3
Limited enrollment. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
RELG 5821: Proseminar in World Religions, World Literatures
Credits: 1
This monthly seminar explores methods and issues vital to the combined study of literatures and religions. It brings all MA students together, under faculty guidance, to attend to the broad range of individual projects and to foster a rich conversation that traverses the emergent field of study.
ENGL 5830: Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
Credits: 3
An interdisciplinary course that includes the following elements: studies in the textual traditions of particular religions; studies in literary theory; studies in literary traditions; the application of literary theory to studies in religious text traditions; and the application of the history of religions to the study of literary canons.
ENGL 5831: Proseminar in World Religions, World Literature
Credits: 1
This monthly seminar explores methods and issues vital to the combined study of literatures and religions. It brings all MA students together, under faculty guidance, to attend to the broad range of individual projects and to foster a rich conversation that traverses the emergent field of study.
ENGL 8110: Medieval Transitions to the Renaissance
Credits: 3
For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.English and Scottish literature from Chaucer to the sixteenth century.
ENMD 8559: New Course in Medieval Literature
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Medieval Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ARAH 8695: Special Reading Problems
Credits: 3–12
Special Reading Problems
ENMD 9500: Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature
Credits: 3
Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
  • Student Council Teaching Award, College of Arts and Sciences, UVa, 2019
  • Visiting Faculty, The Paul Mellon Centre for British Studies, London, England, 1997.
  • Isabel MacCaffrey Prize, International Spenser Society, 1997.
  • Yale’s Poorvu Prize for Interdisciplinary Teaching (with Christy Anderson, History of Art), 1997.
  • Junior Fellow, The Society of Fellows, Harvard University, 1991–1993, 1994–1995.
  • American Council of Learned Societies International Travel Grant, 1994.
  • Whiting Fellow, 1990–1991.
  • Harvard’s Danforth Distinction in Teaching Prize, 1990.
  • Frances A. Yates Fellow, The Warburg Institute, University of London, 1989.
  • Fulbright Scholar, London, England, 1989–1990.