Daniel Gingerich headshot
DG

Daniel Willard Gingerich

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Politics
Office location and address
S254 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D, Government, Harvard University
Biography

Daniel W. Gingerich is Associate Professor of Politics specializing in comparative politics. His research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of corruption and clientelism in Latin America as well as developing new methodologies to study these phenomena.  Gingerich has published articles in journals such as Political Analysis, the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of Theoretical Politics. He is the author of Political Institutions and Party-Directed Corruption in South America: Stealing for the Team (Cambridge University Press, series: Political Economy of Institutions and Decisions). This book was selected as runner-up for the 2014 William H. Riker Book Award by the Political Economy Section of the American Political Science Association, awarded to “the best book on political economy published during the past three calendar years.” Gingerich is also the sole principal investigator on a large scale, NSF funded project entitled “Can Institutions Cure Clientelism? Assessing the Impact of the Australian Ballot in Brazil.” (SES-1119908). This project provides a rigorous examination of how the transition from the nominal to effective secret vote shapes the nature of political representation by focusing on the historical experience of Brazil before and after the Australian Ballot (AB) was introduced in this county. Prior to coming to Virginia, Gingerich held a fellowship at Princeton’s Center for the Study of Democratic Politics.  During the 2012-2013 academic year, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC.

Can Institutions Cure Clientelism? Assessing the Impact of the Australian Ballot in Brazil
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Soc., Behav. & Eco. Science
September 01, 2011 – August 31, 2014
Can Institutions Cure Clientelism? Assessing the Impact of the Australian Ballot in Brazil
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Soc., Behav. & Eco. Science
July 01, 2011 – August 31, 2013
FORU 1500: Introduction to the Forums
Credits: 3
This course will introduce first-year students to their forum topic. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)
FORU 1510: Continuing the Forum
Credits: 1
This course follows the first-semester introductory forum class and keeps students engaged in the content of their forum. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)
FORU 2500: Forum Capstone Experience
Credits: 3
This course is the capstone course for forum students. It is to be taken in the fourth semester by forum students only. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums).
PLCP 3330: Politics of Latin America
Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of politics in Latin America. Topics include the organization of the New World colonies, the legacies of the colonial period for development, the nature of political competition in Latin America's newly independent states, import-substituting industrialization and populism, the emergence and eclipse of military regimes, the transition to democracy and free markets, and the performance of democracy.
PLCP 4430: Politics of Corruption
Credits: 3
An examination of the causes and consequences of corruption around the world. Assesses the impact of corruption on political and economic development and explores the relationship between corruption and factors such as culture, institutions, economic policies, and natural resources. Prerequisite: PLCP 1010, PLCP 2120 or permission of instructor
PLCP 5550: Causal Inference in Comparative Politics
Credits: 3
Provides a framework for conducting causal inference in comparative research. Research methods considered include: laboratory experiments, field experiments, matching, instrumental variables, and difference-in-difference techniques. The role of formal model building as a guide to causal explanation in the social sciences is also emphasized. Prerequisite: once course in statistics at the level of PLAD 7100 or by permission of instructor.
PLCP 7000: Comparative Politics Core Seminar
Credits: 3
Comparative Politics Core Seminar