Daniel Ortiz headshot
DO

Daniel R. Ortiz

Professor
Director
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB171C
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. Yale Law School 1983
M.Phil. University of Oxford 1980
B.A. Yale University 1978
Biography

Daniel Ortiz, who came to Virginia in 1985, has a wide variety of interests. A Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude Yale graduate, he earned a triple major in mathematics, English and history, the arts and letters. Now as a member of the Virginia law faculty, he teaches constitutional law, administrative law, electoral law, civil procedure and legal theory. In 1992 he received the Z Society Distinguished Teaching Award at the University of Virginia. He served as the Harrison Foundation Research Professor in 1992-95, the Elizabeth D. and Richard A. Merrill Research Professor in 1996-99, and the Joseph C. Carter, Jr., Research Professor in 2000-03.

After graduation from Yale, Ortiz spent two years on a Marshall Scholarship at the University of Oxford, where he completed a Master of Philosophy degree in English studies. Then he returned to Yale for law school and received his J.D. in 1983. He clerked for Judge Stephen G. Breyer of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. He was a visiting professor at the University of Southern California in 1991 and 1994-96 and at the University of California at Berkeley (Boalt Hall) in 1999.

LAW 6000: Civil Procedure
Credits: 4
This course covers the procedures courts use in deciding lawsuits that do not involve criminal misconduct. Much of it is concerned with the process of litigation in trial courts, from the initial documents called pleadings, through the pre-trial process, especially the process of discovery in which parties obtain information from one another, to trial itself.
LAW 8624: Supreme Court Litigation Clinic (YR)
Credits: 4
This is the first semester of a yearlong clinic introducing students to all aspects of current U.S. Supreme Court practice through live cases. Working on teams, students will handle actual cases from the seeking of Supreme Court review to briefing on the merits.
LAW 8625: Supreme Court Litigation Clinic (YR)
Credits: 4
This is the second semester of a yearlong clinic introducing students to all aspects of current U.S. Supreme Court practice through live cases. Working on teams, students will handle actual cases from the seeking of Supreme Court review to briefing on the merits.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 9039: Supreme Court: October Term
Credits: 3
This seminar will examine the Supreme Court by intensive study of the Court's most recent Term, October Term 2008, which concludes in June 2009. After a brief introduction to the workings of the Court, the seminar will closely examine the most significant decisions from last Term.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9091: Seminar in Ethical Values (1-Term)
Credits: 1
This is a 1-term version of the seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.