David Green headshot
DG

David L. Green

Associate Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Office location and address
Wilsdorf Hall, Room 324
385 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
​B.S. Boston University, 1991
​M.S. University of Maryland, 1997
​Ph.D. University of Maryland, 2001
Biography

Our research group focuses on the synthesis of well-defined nanoparticles, their dispersion into polymer solutions and melts, and their suspension rheology.

First, we study the mechanisms that produce well-defined nanoparticles and then use this knowledge to optimize for a range of industrially relevant properties such as particle stability, surface expression, or catalytic activity. We are also interested in developing timely methods for determining nanoparticle growth rates inside of emulsions which are used in formulating a variety of commercial products like fiber-optic coatings, automotive finishes, and chromatographic packings.

Second, we examine how grafting uniform polymers to the interfaces of well-defined nanoparticles affects their rheological behavior in polymer solutions and melts. With our fundamental studies, we seek to optimize processing to achieve a desirable microstructure in industrial suspensions, and to set a foundation for developing constitutive rheological models that predict the complex behavior of industrial suspensions. To this end, we use rheological and rheo-optical measurements to elucidate how the interactions within model suspensions affect their flow at nano-, micro-, and macroscopic length scales the full range of interactions that effect the processing of engineered materials.

REU Site: Advanced Materials Synthesis at the University of Virginia
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
September 01, 2021 – August 31, 2024
Computational and Experimental Investigations of Phase-Separated Monolayers on Ultrasmall Noble Metal Nanoparticles
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
August 01, 2019 – July 31, 2022
EN-CHE Automated UV Curable Masking System
Source: Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing
July 08, 2013 – July 30, 2014
EN-CHE Extension of Pneumatic Cylinder Lifetime
Source: Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing
June 01, 2012 – February 28, 2014
ENGR 1620: Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 3
ENGR 1620 is a cornerstone course for first year engineering students. They are introduced to the philosophy and practice of engineering through hands-on experience in developing solutions for various open-ended, realistic challenges while considering the various contexts in which these challenges occur. Students will also learn about the majors SEAS offers and receive advisement about careers, plans of study, and major declaration. Prerequisite: First year enrollment in SEAS; exceptions are by instructor permission.
ENGR 1624: Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 4
Cornerstone course for first-year SEAS undergraduates, introducing them to engineering practice and design philosophy, via exposure to open-ended, realistic , hands-on challenges. Students engage in both individual and team work, and consider the contexts in which engineering challenges arise. SEAS majors and potential career paths are also introduced. Students who have taken ENGR 1620 or 1621 or both, can't enroll in ENGR 1624.
MSE 2500: Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Special topic courses in Materials Science and Engineering
ENGR 2595: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–4
Special Topics in Engineering.
CHE 3322: Transport Processes II: Heat and Mass Transfer
Credits: 4
Fundamental concepts of heat and mass transfer; applications of these concepts and material and energy conservation calculations for design of heat exchanger and packed absorption/stripping columns. Four lecture hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2216, 3316, 3321
CHE 4442: Applied Surface Chemistry
Credits: 3
Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, emphasizing thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application to areas such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 4995: Chemical Engineering Research
Credits: 1–3
Library and laboratory study of an engineering or manufacturing problem conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty member, often including the design, construction, and operation of laboratory scale equipment. Requires progress reports and a comprehensive written report. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6442: Applied Surface Chemistry
Credits: 3
Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with emphasis on thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena; applications such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, flow through porous media, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, electrocapillarity. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
EP 7000: Graduate Seminar
Credits: 1
Weekly seminars for graduate students in Engineering Physics offered every semester. All resident EP graduate students enroll each semester.
MSE 7820: Materials Science Seminar
Credits: 1
Broad topics and in-depth subject treatments are presented. The course is related to research areas in materials science and involves active student participation.
CHE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
CHE 8998: Master's Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
MSE 8999: Masters Degree Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CHE 9999: Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
MSE 9999: PHD Dissertation Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.

Visiting Researcher, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Jülich Research Center in Germany) 2013

NSF CAREER Award 2007-2012

NSF International Research Fellow, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium 2003-2004