Dorothy Wong headshot
DW

Dorothy Wong

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Art
Office location and address
151 Rugby Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
BA, International Christian University, Tokyo
M. Phil., Chinese University of Hong Kong
PhD, Harvard University, 1995
Biography

Specializing in Buddhist art of medieval China, Dorothy Wong's research addresses topics of art in relation to religion and society, and of the relationship between religious texts/doctrine and visual representations. Her publications include Chinese Steles: Pre-Buddhist and Buddhist Use of a Symbolic Form (2004; Chinese edition 2011), Hōryūji Reconsidered (editor and contributing author, 2008), China and Beyond in the Mediaeval Period: Cultural Crossings and Inter-regional Connections (co-editor with Gustav Heldt, and contributing author, 2014), and many articles on a wide range of topics in relation to Buddhist art. Her most recent book manuscript, Buddhist Pilgrim-Monks as Agents of Cultural and Artistic Transmission: The International Buddhist Art Style in East Asia, ca. 645-770, will be published by the National University of Singapore Press in 2017.

As a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia, she is working on a digital project entitled: "Power of Compassion: Paths of Transmission of Avalokitesvara"
(http://www.iath.virginia.edu/silkroad/).

Dorothy Wong previously has taught at Florida State University from 1995 to 1997. As Visiting Professor, she has also taught at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Eötövs Loránd University, Budapest, and the Centre of Buddhist Studies at the University of Hong Kong. A former editor of the Asian art magazine Orientations, she currently serves on the editorial board of Buddhist Art of China. She has received fellowships from the American Association of University Women, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, the Whiting Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the National Humanities Center. She has been appointed a three-year term as a Foreign Research Fellow of the International Wutai Institute of Buddhism and East Asian Culture, China, in 2016. She is also affiliated with the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Hong Kong. Currently she serves as the Director of the East Asia Center at the University of Virginia.

ARTH 1507: Art and Global Cultures
Credits: 3
This course will train students to understand and evaluate global cultures from a critical and culturally sensitive perspective.
USEM 1580: University Seminar
Credits: 2–3
Consult the University Seminars web page at https://provost.virginia.edu/subsite/academic-affairs/student-experience/university-seminars (copy and paste web address into browser) for specific descriptions.
ARTH 2861: East Asian Art
Credits: 3–4
Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.
ARTH 3559: New Course in History of Art
Credits: 3–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject History in Art.
ARTH 3591: Art History Colloquium
Credits: 3
The Art History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. This course fulfills the second writing requirement, involving at least two writing assignments totaling at a minimum 4,000 words (20 pages).
ARTH 3861: Chinese Art
Credits: 3–4
The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writings of leading scholars.
ARTH 3863: East Asian Art, Landscape, and Ecology
Credits: 3
This course introduces the concepts on nature in East Asian traditions--Daoism, Shinto, Buddhism, Confucianism, their impacts on the relationship between human and their natural environment, and the art forms in which the theme of nature predominates, from landscape paintings to religious and garden architecture. It also explores how these ideas can contribute to the modern discourse on environmental ethics and sustainability.
ARTH 3993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent study in the history of art
ARTH 4998: Undergraduate Thesis Research
Credits: 3
Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.
EAST 5861: Chinese Art
Credits: 3
The course familiarizes students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts.
EAST 5862: Monuments of Japanese Art
Credits: 3
The course focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played a central role in Japanese art and society. Topics range from art and architecture of Shinto and Buddhism of the classical period, late Heian court art, Zen paintings and garden architecture, and also decorative paintings and woodblock prints of the later period.
EAST 5863: East Asian Art, Landscape, and Ecology
Credits: 3
This course introduces the concepts on nature in East Asian traditions--Daoism, Shinto, Buddhism, Confucianism, their impacts on the relationship between human and their natural environment, and the art forms in which the theme of nature predominates, from landscape paintings to religious and garden architecture. It also explores how these ideas can contribute to the modern discourse on environmental ethics and sustainability.
EAST 5864: Art, Death, and Ritual: Mysteries of Ancient China
Credits: 3
Through the close study of well-documented archaeological sites of ancient China, which reveal ritual practices as well as astonishing grave goods that include spectacular jades and bronzes, this course explores the Chinese notions of afterlife, ancestor worship, state ritual, and immortality cults. The material culture and beliefs and practices examined form a backdrop to understanding the period when ancient Chinese civilization was formed.
ARAH 8695: Special Reading Problems
Credits: 3–12
Special Reading Problems
ARAH 8998: Non-Topical Rsch, Masters Prep
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ARAH 8999: Non-Topical Research, Masters
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
ARAH 9585: Seminar in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia
Credits: 3
Investigates problems in art of East, South, and Southeast Asia
ARAH 9995: Supervised Research
Credits: 3–12
Supervised Research
ARAH 9998: Non-Topical Rsch,Doctoral Prep
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
ARAH 9999: Non-Topical Research, Doctoral
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.