Daniel Quinn headshot
DQ

Daniel Benjamin Quinn

Assistant Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Office location and address
MEC 310
151 Engineer's Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia
Ph.D. Hydrodynamics Lab, Princeton University
Post-Doc ​Bio-Inspired Research and Design group, Stanford University
Biography

Asst. Professor Quinn first came to the University of Virginia as an undergraduate student in 2006. After graduating with a BS in Aerospace Engineering, he attended Princeton University and completed a PhD in the Hydrodynamics Lab working on bio-inspired propulsion with Professor Lex Smits. Professor Smits nominated Professor Quinn for the American Physical Society’s Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award in Fluid Dynamics, which Quinn earned in recognition of his doctoral thesis, Optimizing the Efficiency of Batoid-Inspired Swimming. As a winner, he was invited to the Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society, where in November he will give an award lecture describing his PhD research.

While at Princeton, Quinn was also a Visiting Fellow at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. He went on to become a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Bio-Inspired Research and Design group at Stanford University, studying the stability characteristics of birds flying in turbulent gusts. Professor Quinn joined the UVA faculty in the fall of 2016. He is a member of the Link Lab, a group of researchers studying Cyber-Physical Systems – particularly autonomous vehicles, body sensor networks, and smart homes.

Collaborative Research: Unsteady Ground Effect: How Solid Boundaries Affect Bio-Inspired Propulsion
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
September 01, 2019 – August 31, 2022
Harnessing the efficiency and maneuverability of multi-fin bio-inspired vehicles
Source: U.S. DOD - Navy - Office Of Naval Research (Onr)
July 01, 2018 – June 30, 2021
MAE 3210: Fluid Mechanics
Credits: 3
Introduction to fluid flow concepts and equations; integral and differential forms of mass, momentum, and energy conservation with emphasis on one-dimensional flow; fluid statics; Bernoulli's equation; viscous effects; Courette flow, Poiseuille flow, and pipe flow; boundary layers; one-dimensional compressible flow; normal shock waves; flow with friction or heat addition; isothermal flow; and applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2130 and MAE 2100
MAE 4513: Aerospace Engineering Special Projects
Credits: 2
Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing.
MAE 4514: Aerospace Engineering Special Projects
Credits: 2
Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing
MAE 6310: Fluid Mechanics I
Credits: 3
The topics covered are: dimensional analysis; physical properties of fluids; kinematic descriptions of flow; streamlines, path lines and streak lines; stream functions and vorticity; hydrostatics and thermodynamics; Euler and Bernoulli equations; irrotational potential flow; exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation; effects of viscosity - high and low Reynolds numbers; waves in incompressible flow; hydrodynamic stability. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
MAE 6592: Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
Credits: 1–3
Study of a specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the first-graduate-course level. May be offered on a seminar or a team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. New graduate courses are usually introduced in this form. Specific topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.
MAE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
MAE 8999: Master's Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 7510 seminar) and 12.
ECE 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MAE 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.
MAE 9999: Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 8591 seminar) and 12.