David Lebland headshot
DL

David Andrew Leblang

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Politics
Office location and address
S281 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Vanderbilt University, Ph.D., Political Science
Biography

David Leblang is professor of politics at the University of Virginia and is a faculty associate at the Miller Center where he is the J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance. He is also a professor of public policy at the University’s Batten School for Leadership and Public Policy, where he is director of the Global Policy Center. A specialist in political economy, Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, The Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense.

He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and more than thirty journal articles in publications including The American Political Science Review, The American Journal of Politics, International Organization, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of International Money and Finance. He has received research support from the National Science Foundation.

Leblang has written on the politics of economic growth, the determinants of exchange rate policy, the causes of currency crises and the link between elections and economic expectations. At present he is working on two large projects. The first examines how sending countries “harness” the human and material resources of their diasporas while the second focuses on the politics and policies that constrain the mobility of labor across states and nations.

MDI Predictive Displacement project
Source: SAVE THE CHILDREN INTERNATIONAL
February 26, 2021 – June 30, 2021
Interos Supply Chain Risk Factors
Source: Interos Inc.
May 21, 2020 – August 14, 2020
AS-POLI Modeling International Migrant Flows: Theory, Evidence and Forecasts
Source: University of Houston
July 01, 2017 – June 30, 2018
FORU 1500: Introduction to the Forums
Credits: 3
This course will introduce first-year students to their forum topic. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)
FORU 1510: Continuing the Forum
Credits: 1
This course follows the first-semester introductory forum class and keeps students engaged in the content of their forum. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)
PLAD 2500: Special Topics in Politics
Credits: 3
Special Topics in Politics
ENGR 2595: Special Topics in Engineering
Credits: 1–4
Special Topics in Engineering.
PLAD 4500: Special Topics
Credits: 3
Topics on a variety of Political issues.
PAVS 4500: Pavilion Seminar
Credits: 3
The Pavilion Seminars are open, by instructor permission, to 3rd and 4th year students. They are 3-credit, multidisciplinary seminars, focused on big topics and limited to max. 15 students each. For detailed descriptions of current offerings, see http://college.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/PAVS.
LPPP 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–6
Independent study in the field of public policy and leadership.
PLAD 5500: Special Topics
Credits: 3
Topics on a variety of Political issues.
LPPP 5540: Applied Policy Clinics
Credits: 2
Applied Policy Clinics Topics Course
LPPP 5559: New Course in Public Policy and Leadership
Credits: 3
Investigates a selected issue in public policy or leadership.
COMM 5559: New Course in Commerce
Credits: 1–3
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Commerce.
LPPP 7993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–6
Student will perform independent projects under close faculty supervision.
GBUS 8008: Democracy and Financial: Politics, Markets, and Institutions
Credits: 3
Today's students likely have an incomplete awareness of the crisis. More broadly, present and future policymakers risk repeating history as the memory of the 2008 crisis fades. It is important that the rising generation of leaders appreciate the causes and consequences of this crisis in anticipation of future crises. Such historical familiarity will be important for the development of leaders in government, business, NGOs, and households.