Carl Knospe headshot
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Carl R. Knospe

Associate Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Office location and address
Mechanical & Aerospace Building, Room 332
130 Chemistry Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​University of Virginia, 1984
Ph.D. ​University of Virginia, 1989
Biography

Prof. Knospe has worked on a variety of research problems in control and mechatronics, including magnetic levitation, vibration control, control of machining chatter, and stability and performance of time-delay systems. Recently, his research has focused on the use of capillary interfaces in micromechatronic systems, including electrowetting, capillary force actuation, and liquid-liquid interface sensors. Dr. Knospe has served as an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, IEEE Control Systems Magazine, and Mechatronics.

Path-Planning and Autonomous Control for Avian-Inspired Landing - Fellowship on behalf of Grant Gibson
Source: Virginia Space Grant Consortium
June 01, 2017 – May 31, 2018
EN-MAE MEMS Breakthrough Liquid-Liquid MEMS Sensors - Ruotolo
Source: Virginia Space Grant Consortium
June 01, 2015 – May 31, 2016
ENGR 1620: Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 3
ENGR 1620 is a cornerstone course for first year engineering students. They are introduced to the philosophy and practice of engineering through hands-on experience in developing solutions for various open-ended, realistic challenges while considering the various contexts in which these challenges occur. Students will also learn about the majors SEAS offers and receive advisement about careers, plans of study, and major declaration. Prerequisite: First year enrollment in SEAS; exceptions are by instructor permission.
ENGR 1624: Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 4
Cornerstone course for first-year SEAS undergraduates, introducing them to engineering practice and design philosophy, via exposure to open-ended, realistic , hands-on challenges. Students engage in both individual and team work, and consider the contexts in which engineering challenges arise. SEAS majors and potential career paths are also introduced. Students who have taken ENGR 1620 or 1621 or both, can't enroll in ENGR 1624.
MAE 3010: Astronautics
Credits: 3
Discussion of the Keplerian two-body problem; elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic orbits; solution of Kepler's equation and analogs; the classical orbital elements; orbit determination; prediction of future position and velocity; orbital perturbations; Lambert's problem. Prerequisites: MAE 2320.
MAE 3710: Mechanical Systems
Credits: 3
Presents general concepts of dynamical systems modeling and provides mathematical tools to develop and analyze models that describe input/output behaviors of physical systems. Topics include basic elements of mechanical systems, transfer functions, frequency response, stability and poles, resonance and natural frequency, transient and time constant, steady state and DC gain, block diagrams. Prerequisites: MAE 2320 and APMA 2130
MAE 3730: Flight Vehicle Dynamics
Credits: 3
Introduces definitions and concepts and includes a review of longitudinal static stability; rigid body dynamics: general equations of motion, rotating coordinate systems; small disturbance theory; atmospheric flight mechanics, stability derivatives; motion analysis of aircraft; static and dynamic stability; aircraft handling qualities; and an introduction to flight control systems and automatic stabilization. Prerequisite: MAE 2010 and MAE 2320.
MAE 4730: Introduction to Automatic Controls
Credits: 3
Discusses the mathematics of feedback control systems; transfer functions; basic servo theory; stability analysis; root locus techniques; and graphical methods. Applications to analysis and design of mechanical systems, emphasizing hydraulic, pneumatic, and electromechanical devices. Prerequisite: MAE 2320 and 3710.
MAE 6210: Analytical Dynamics
Credits: 3
Classical analytical dynamics from a modern mathematical viewpoint: Newton's laws, dynamical variables, many particle systems; the Lagrangian formulation, constraints and configuration manifolds, tangent bundles, differential manifolds; variational principles, least action; non-potential forces; constrained problems; linear oscillations; Hamiltonian formulation: canonical equations, Rigid body motion. Prerequisite: Undergraduate physics, ordinary differential equations.
MAE 8897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For master's students.
MAE 8999: Master's Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 7510 seminar) and 12.
MAE 9897: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral students.
MAE 9999: Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 8591 seminar) and 12.