Christopher Krentz headshot
CK

Christopher B. Krentz

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of English
Office location and address
110 Bryan Hall
201 Cabell Dr
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Education
Ph.D. Virginia, 2002
M.A. Virginia, 1995
B.A. Yale, 1989
ENLT 2555: Special Topics
Credits: 3
Usually an introduction to non-traditional or specialized topics in literary studies, (e.g., native American literature, gay and lesbian studies, techno-literacy, Arthurian romance, Grub Street in eighteenth-century England, and American exceptionalism). For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
HIUS 3081: History of the American Deaf Community
Credits: 3
This new course will examine the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods and secondary sources. We will also view a few historical films. Prerequisite: none (though a previous class in History or ASL is recommended)
ASL 3400: Deafness in Literature and Film
Credits: 3
This course will study the contradictory and telling ways that deaf people have been depicted over the last three centuries in addressing the question: What does deafness signify, especially in a western society that is centered upon speech? Our approach will be contrapuntal, juxtaposing canonical texts and mainstream films with relatively unknown works by deaf artists.
ENSP 3400: Deafness in Literature and Film
Credits: 3
What does deafness signify, especially in a western society that is centered upon speech? This course the contradictory and telling ways that deaf people have been depicted over the last three centuries. The syllabus juxtaposes canonical texts or mainstream films with relatively unknown works by deaf artists
ENCR 3410: Contemporary Disability Theory
Credits: 3
This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to disability in the social, cultural, political, artistic, ethical, and medical spheres and their intersections. It also introduces students to critical theory concerned with the rights of the disabled.
ASL 3410: Contemporary Disability Theory
Credits: 3
This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to disability in the social, cultural, political, artistic, ethical, and medical spheres and their intersections. It also introduces students to critical theory concerned with the rights of the disabled.
ENAM 3450: American Short Novel
Credits: 3
Examines American short novels since 1840 by such authors as Poe, Melville, James, Jewett, Crane, Larsen, Faulkner, Reed, MacLean, Auster, and Chang. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENMC 3500: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
Credits: 3
This course takes up topics in the study of literature in English in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
GSGS 3559: New Course in Global Studies
Credits: 1–6
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Studies.
ENMC 3559: New Course in Modern and Contemporary Literature.
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Modern and Contemporary Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3560: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
Credits: 3
This course takes up topics in the study of literature in English in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3612: World Literature in English
Credits: 3
This course will explore Anglophone fiction and drama from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean over the last half century. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 3840: Contemporary Disability Theory
Credits: 3
This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to disability in the social, cultural, political, artistic, ethical, and medical spheres and their intersections. It also introduces students to critical theory concerned with the rights of the disabled.
ENGL 3922: Deafness in Literature and Film
Credits: 3
What does deafness signify, especially in a western society that is centered upon speech? This course the contradictory and telling ways that deaf people have been depicted over the last three centuries. The syllabus juxtaposes canonical texts or mainstream films with relatively unknown works by deaf artists
ENMC 4530: Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Limited enrollment. An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the interrelationships between literature and history, the social sciences, philosophy, religion, and the fine arts in the Modern period. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ENGL 4561: Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture
Credits: 3
Limited enrollment. An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the interrelationships between literature and history, the social sciences, philosophy, religion, and the fine arts in the Modern period. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASL 4750: Contemporary Deaf Studies
Credits: 3
Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.
ENGL 5559: New Course in English Literature
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of English Literature. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
LING 7750: Contemporary Deaf Studies
Credits: 3
Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.
ENGL 8560: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
Credits: 3
Studies vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
ENGL 8993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
A single semester of independent study under faculty supervision for MA or PhD students in English doing intensive research on a subject not covered in the usual courses. Requires approval by a faculty member who has agreed to supervise a guided course of reading and substantial written exercise, a detailed outline of the research project, and authorization by the Director of Graduate Studies in English. Only one may be offered for Ph.D credit. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
LING 9010: Directed Research
Credits: 3
Special Areas Students should choose electives in one or more of the following areas: anthropology, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and Cultures, comparative Latin and Greek, English language study, Germanic linguistics, Indic linguistics, philosophy, psychology, Romance linguistics, Slavic linguistics.
  • Co-director, Disability Studies Initiative at U.Va. (2015-present)
  • Editorial Board, Sign Language Studies (1999-present) and Disability Studies Quarterly (2010-12)
  • MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession (2003-2006)
  • Coordinator, Annual ASL/Deaf Culture Lecture Series (1995; 2003-14; co-coordinator 1996-99)
  • Finalist, 1998 Seven Society Graduate Fellowship for Superb Teaching, University of Virginia