Coulter George headshot
CG

Coulter Harris George

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Classics
Office location and address
B028 Cocke Hall
20 South Lawn
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Biography

I was an undergraduate at Rice University (B.A. 1997 in Classics and German). I then went to graduate school in England at the University of Cambridge (M.Phil. 1998, Ph.D. 2002). I then taught at Rice for two years, before returning to Trinity College, Cambridge, for a four-year research fellowship. I joined the department here in Charlottesville in 2007.

GREE 1010: Elementary Greek
Credits: 4
Attic Greek: beginning grammar, composition, and selected readings. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 1020: Elementary Greek
Credits: 4
Attic Greek: beginning grammar, composition, and selected readings. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 2010: Intermediate Greek I
Credits: 3
Xenophon and Plato. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 1010-1020.
CLAS 3300: Introduction to Indo-european Linguistics
Credits: 3
Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single "proto-language," called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source?
CLAS 3350: Language and Literature of the Early Celts
Credits: 3
This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and Britain unites two approaches, one literary, one linguistic. First, we will compare descriptions of the Celts found in Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland's great prose epic, the Táin Bó Cúailnge. Second, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish as well as touching on Middle Welsh and Gaulish.
LATI 3559: New Course in Latin
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of Latin. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent Study in Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 4998: Greek Distinguished Majors Thesis Research
Credits: 3
Independent research under direction of a faculty member leading to writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis or comparable project
LATI 4999: Latin Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing
Credits: 3
Writing of Distinguished Majors thesis or comparable project. Prerequisites: LATI 4998
GREE 4999: Greek Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing
Credits: 3
Writing of Distinguished Majors thesis or comparable project. Prerequisite: GREE 4998
GREE 5090: Prose Composition
Credits: 3
Translation from English into Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 5240: Language of Epic
Credits: 3
This course will explore the language of Greek epic poetry (chiefly Homer, but also Hesiod, the Hymns, and Apollonius). What is the nature of the epic Kunstsprache? How does its syntax differ from that of Classical Attic? To what extent can linguistic features be used to date the poems? How much flexibility does the poet have in the use of formulas? How do later poets manipulate the traditional linguistic patterns inherited from earlier epic?
GREE 5250: Demosthenes
Credits: 3
Demosthenes has long enjoyed a reputation as the best of the Greek orators - a view found, for instance, in Cicero, who knew a thing or two about giving a speech. Through close reading of the First and Third Philippics, On the Crown, and selections from other speeches, together with the necessary secondary literature, this course will examine what it is about Demosthenes' language, style, and rhetoric that led to his preeminence in the field.
CLAS 5300: Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Credits: 3
Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single "proto-language," called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source?
GREE 5559: New Course in Greek
Credits: 1–4
New course in Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
LATI 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
GREE 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.