Chad Meliza headshot
CM

Chad Meliza

Assistant Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Psychology
Office location and address
485 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Biography

My lab studies neural mechanisms of pattern learning and recognition in the auditory system of songbirds. Songbirds can learn to recognize hundreds of songs from different individuals under challenging and variable acoustic conditions. We study this behavior using a neuroethological approach that combines observational studies, operant conditioning, acute and chronic electrophysiology, and dynamical systems models.

Experience-dependent plasticity of auditory processing for vocal communication
Source: U.S. NIH Institute on Deafness & Other Communicati
April 01, 2020 – March 31, 2025
CAREER: Neural Mechanisms of Auditory Object Recognition
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
February 15, 2020 – January 31, 2025
An animal model to investigate the neural and genetic basis of dyslexia and other language-processing disorders
Source: The Hartwell Foundation
April 01, 2019 – March 31, 2022
AS-PSYC Biophysical, Dynamical-Systems Models of Neurons that Recognize Complex Acoustic Patterns
Source: Jeffress Memorial Trust
June 30, 2015 – March 31, 2017
PSYC 3240: Animal Minds
Credits: 3
This course looks at the evolutionary basis of cognition through the lens of animal behavior, with an emphasis on understanding how general mechanisms of perception and learning interact with more specialized systems for navigation, social interaction, and planning to produce the rich behavioral adaptations seen throughout the animal kingdom.
PSYC 3559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 3590: Research in Psychology
Credits: 2–3
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.
COGS 3960: Cognitive Science Research
Credits: 3
This course aims to provide faculty-supervised research experience. A faculty mentor should be identified before enrollment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Faculty supervisor permission.
NESC 3960: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Students in Neuroscience major are expected to participate in active research, supervised by a faculty research mentor. The course grade is based on 10 hours/week lab work toward achieving term goals that are determined individually at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to submit a Term Plan one month after the first day of classes and a Progress Report two weeks before the last day of classes.
NESC 4960: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment under the direction of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. Prerequisite: Major in Neuroscience.
NESC 4970: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
COGS 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings.
NESC 4980: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
COGS 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings.
PSYC 5270: Computational Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Develops skills in processing neural data and analyzing its relationship to stimulus or motor activity. Topics include information theory, receptive fields, point processes, and mixed-effects models. Emphasis is on implementing theoretical concepts with computer programs. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PSYC 5559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 7502: Contemporary Issues: Neuroscience and Behavior
Credits: 2
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7559: New Course in Psychology
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 8998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Thesis
Credits: 1–12
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PSYC 9501: Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9910: Neuroscience Rotations
Credits: 3
An exposure to the working techniques and interactions of the modern neuroscience laboratory.
PSYC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
NESC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
NESC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, under the supervision of a dissertation director.
PSYC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.