Christopher Deppmann headshot
CD

Christopher Deppmann

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Biology
Office location and address
410 PLSB
90 Geldard Driv
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S., Western Michigan University, 1997
Ph.D., Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Purdue University, 2003
Postdoctoral, Johns Hopkins University, SOM, 2003-2009
AS-BIOL_Extrinsic Mechanism Governing Injury-Induced Axon Degeneration
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Neurological Disorders & Str
August 15, 2015 – March 31, 2026
Deciphering trophic signaling programs governing peripheral sensory nervous system development
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Neurological Disorders & Str
December 01, 2019 – November 30, 2024
AS-BIOL Extrinsic Mechanism Governing Injury-Induced Axon Degeneration
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Neurological Disorders & Str
August 15, 2015 – July 31, 2020
AS-BIOL Emergent properties of systems matching in peripheral nervous system development
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
July 15, 2015 – June 30, 2020
Receptor mediated death pathways in Alzheimer's pathogenesis
Source: Virginia Commonwealth University
July 01, 2019 – June 30, 2020
The role of TrkA positive extracellular vesicles in sympathetic neuron survival and maturation fellowship on behalf of Austin Keeler
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Neurological Disorders & Str
August 01, 2017 – August 31, 2019
AS-BIOL RUI: Polymer Surface Control and Activation to Study Nervous System Function
Source: James Madison University
June 15, 2013 – May 14, 2017
Mechanisms of Neuronal Competition During Development
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of Neurological Disorders & Str
April 01, 2011 – March 31, 2017
AS-BIOL Treating Childhood Metabolic Disorders and Obesity with a Sympathetic Approach
Source: The Hartwell Foundation
April 01, 2012 – August 31, 2016
RS-2012 i6 Challenge - Virginia Innovation Partnership (VIP)
Source: U.S. DOC - Economic Development Administration
October 01, 2012 – March 31, 2015
NESC 3960: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Students in Neuroscience major are expected to participate in active research, supervised by a faculty research mentor. The course grade is based on 10 hours/week lab work toward achieving term goals that are determined individually at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to submit a Term Plan one month after the first day of classes and a Progress Report two weeks before the last day of classes.
NESC 3995: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
This course provides opportunities for first and second year students who have not yet declared a major to engage in supervised research activities.
BIOL 4320: Signal Transduction: How cells talk to each other
Credits: 3
This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010
BIOL 4360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development
Credits: 1
This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.
BIOL 4900: Independent Readings in Biology
Credits: 1–3
Tutorial or seminar course that allows intensive study of the literature in a particular area of biology under the guidance of a Biology faculty member.
BIOL 4920: Independent Research in Biology
Credits: 2
Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member within the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
BIOL 4930: Distinguished Major Thesis Research
Credits: 2
This course is the final semester of Independent Research for participants of the Biology Distinguished Majors Program. During this semester, students will complete their laboratory investigations, ultimately presenting the sum of their work in a written thesis. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
NESC 4960: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment under the direction of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. Prerequisite: Major in Neuroscience.
PSYC 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.
NESC 4970: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
NESC 4980: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
PSYC 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.
BIOL 7320: Signal Transduction: How cells talk to each other
Credits: 3
This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment.
BIOL 7360: Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development
Credits: 1
This is a journal club format colloquium where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.
NESC 8000: Foundations of Neuroscience
Credits: 6
This advanced course introduces critical areas in neuroscience. In 3 sections, it covers: Molecular, Cellular, Dev Neuroscience, Systems & Circuits, and Behavior & Disease. Will explore: nervous sys development, basic principles of neurobio, membrane & action potential, ion channels, synaptic transmission & modulation, brain structures, sensory & motor circuits, neurological disease, animal models used to study them & the clinical context.
NESC 8010: Seminar in Neuroscience
Credits: 2
Topics of current interest in neuroscience are presented and discussed by both the program faculty and visiting neuroscientists from other institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.
NESC 8020: Seminar in Neuroscience
Credits: 1–12
Topics of current interest are presented and discussed by both the program faculty and visiting neuroscientists from other institutions. Prerequisite:  Permission of program director.
NESC 8150: Introduction to Research
Credits: 1–6
Laboratory experience acquaints the student with applied theory and current techniques in addressing research problems in neuroscience. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.
BIOL 8270: Seven Habits of Highly Effective Graduate Students
Credits: 2
Weekly discussion to acclimate new graduate students to rigors of academic research in the Department of Biology. There will be an emphasis on time management, scientific writing, presentations, and work-life balance. A rotation of Biology faculty, students, and staff will contribute to the weekly discussion.
BIOL 8999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
NESC 9010: Molecular Neuroscience
Credits: 2
This course will provide the strong foundation in signal transduction in developing neurons. Upon completion of this course, students will understand signal transduction in neural development and beyond. This will be a combination of lecture and discussion of classic and contemporary literature.
NESC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
BIOL 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
NESC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, under the supervision of a dissertation director.
BIOL 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.