Charles Holt heasdshot
CH
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Economics
Office location and address
Monroe 238
248 McCormick Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Education
Bachelor of Arts (BA), Washington & Lee University
Master of Science (MS), Carnegie Mellon University
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Carnegie Mellon University
Biography

Charles Holt is the A. Willis Robertson Professor of Political Economy at the University of Virginia, where he also teaches in the Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Previously, he taught at Minnesota, after finishing graduate work at Carnegie-Mellon, where he studied under Ed Prescott and Morris DeGroot.  

He is the currently the director of the Experimental Economics Laboratory at Virginia. He develops and programs the web-based VeconLab experiments that are widely used for teaching and research (over 90,000 participant logins per year). His publications include over a hundred articles in academic journals, focused on game theory, auctions, experimental economics, and the teaching of economics. He has written and edited several books on topics in experimental economics and was a founding co-editor of the journal Experimental Economics. He has previously served as President of the Economic Science Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Society of Economic Educators. Much of his research pertains to auction design, e.g. for greenhouse gas allowances, spectrum licenses, auto license plates, and toxic banking assets. Other work includes measures of risk aversion and subjective beliefs, and studies of strategic behavior in games and bargaining, using a mix of theory and experiment.

His most recent book is Quantal Response Equilibrium: A Stochastic Theory of Games (coauthored with Tom Palfrey and Jacob Goeree), Princeton University Press, 2016.

Behavioral Influences on Investment and Production in Asset Markets: An Experimental Study
Source: INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR RESEARCH IN EXPERIMEN
June 01, 2021 – December 31, 2022
AS-ECON Auction Design for Allocating Allowances and Licenses
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
May 01, 2015 – April 30, 2018
AS-ECON Mike Schrek - Initiative on Philanthropy and Decision Making
Source: University Of Chicago
June 01, 2014 – May 31, 2015
NSCC/SA: Collaborative Research: Experimental Analysis of Alternative Models of Conflict Bargaining
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Soc., Behav. & Eco. Science
September 15, 2009 – February 28, 2014
AS-ECON: Collaborative Research: NSCC/SA: Behavioral Insights into National Security Issues
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate Soc., Behav. & Eco. Science
September 15, 2009 – August 31, 2013
ECON 3559: New Course in Economics
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of economics.
ECON 4820: Experimental Economics
Credits: 3
Explores the use of laboratory methods to study economic behavior. Topics include experimental design, laboratory technique, financial incentives, and analysis of data. Emphasizes applications: bargaining, auctions, market price competition, market failures, voting, contributions to public goods, lottery choice decisions, and the design of electronic markets for financial assets. Prerequisite: ECON 3010 or 3110 and a course in statistics, or instructor permission.
ECON 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–3
Independent study under the direction of a regular faculty member. Students may not use this class to obtain academic credit for a summer internship. Prerequisite: GPA of 3.300 in UVa ECON courses.
ECON 5559: New Course in Economics
Credits: 1–4
New course in the subject of economics.
ECON 8430: Workshop in Economic Theory and Experimental Economics
Credits: 3
Current research in Economic Theory and Experimental Economics. Prerequisite: Third-year status or instructor permission.
ECON 8820: Experimental Economics
Credits: 3
Analysis of the use of laboratory methods to study economic behavior. Topics include experimental design, laboratory technique, and nonparametric analysis of data. Emphasizes using controlled observations to evaluate alternative economic theories and policies. Applications include bargaining, auctions, oligopoly, asymmetric information, voting, public goods, financial markets, and tests of expected utility and game theories. Prerequisite: ECON 7010 or instructor permission.
ECON 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of the first reader or prospective first reader.