Andrew Kahrl headshot
AK

Andrew W. Kahrl

Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of History
Office location and address
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
Ph.D., Indiana University (2008)
B.A., Kenyon College (2001)
The Power to Destroy: A Hidden History of Race and Taxes in America
Source: U.S. Nfah - Nat'L Endowment For The Humanities
January 01, 2022 – June 30, 2022
Historic Context Study: African American Outdoor Recreation
Source: Organization Of American Historians
March 01, 2019 – September 30, 2021
AS-HIST ACLS Ryskamp Fellowship for Andrew Kahrl
Source: American Council of Learned Societies
August 01, 2014 – July 31, 2015
RELG 2559: New Course in Religious Studies
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
HIST 2559: New Course in General History
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
LASE 3500: Civic and Community Engagement
Credits: 3
A community engagement curriculum refers to teaching, scholarship & learning that connects faculty, students, & the community in mutually beneficial collaborations. Community engagement improves students' content knowledge, critical thinking, career choice, cultural competency, leadership, & commitment to social change. These classes complement & build on existing course offerings and offer an opportunity to move beyond the classroom.
HIUS 3559: New Course in United States History
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIUS 3652: Afro-American History Since 1865
Credits: 3
Studies the history of black Americans from the Civil War to the present.
HIUS 3853: From Redlines to Subprime: Race and Real Estate in the US
Credits: 3
Course examines the relationship of race, real estate, wealth, and poverty in the 20th c. US. Readings focus on the role homeownership and residential location played in shaping educational options, job prospects, living expenses, health, quality of life, and ability to accumulate wealth; the impact of federal policies and industry practices on patterns of residential racial segregation; and struggles for integration and equal access.
PAVS 4500: Pavilion Seminar
Credits: 3
The Pavilion Seminars are open, by instructor permission, to 3rd and 4th year students. They are 3-credit, multidisciplinary seminars, focused on big topics and limited to max. 15 students each. For detailed descriptions of current offerings, see http://college.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/PAVS.
PLAP 5993: Selected Problems in American Politics
Credits: 1–3
Independent study under faculty supervision, for students who are preparing for intensive research on a specific topic. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
HIUS 7151: The United States, 1945-Present
Credits: 3
An intensive reading course emphasizing historiographic approaches to synthesizing post-war America.
HIUS 7559: New Course in United States History
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIST 8999: Research in History
Credits: 1–12
For master's essay and other research carried out prior to advancement to candidacy, taken under the supervision of the student's adviser.
HIUS 9025: Tutorial in Post-World War II U.S. Political History
Credits: 3
This course will survey the history and historiography of American politics and political economy from 1945 to the present. Readings and meetings will address major themes in American political history, including: liberalism and conservatism, education, housing, suburbanization and the urban crisis, racial inequality, and the culture wars.
HIUS 9029: Tutorial in Civil Rights Movement History
Credits: 3
This course will survey the history and historiography of the civil rights movement in America. Readings and meetings will address major themes in the history and legacy of the Black Freedom Struggle.
HIUS 9037: US Urban History
Credits: 3
This course will survey scholarship in US urban history. It is intended for graduate students who intend to specialize in this sub-field and/or conduct research that engages themes in urban history and historiography, broadly conceived.
HIST 9964: Master's Essay Revision
Credits: 3
This course is intended for PhD candidates to revise their master's essays for publication under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. It is typically taken in first semester of the second year of study.
HIST 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.

2013 Liberty Legacy Foundation Award (Organization of American Historians) For best book on the civil rights struggle from the beginnings of the nation to the present

Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship, American Council of Learned Societies

Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies

Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies

2007 Louis Pelzer Memorial Award (Organization of American Historians) For best essay by a candidate for a graduate degree on any topic or period in United States history